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Famous Short Freedom Poems. Short Freedom Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Freedom Poems. Short Freedom Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Freedom short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

 
by William Butler Yeats

Parnell

 Parnell came down the road, he said to a cheering man:
'Ireland shall get her freedom and you still break stone.
'


by Dorothy Parker

Prisoner

 Long I fought the driving lists,
Plume a-stream and armor clanging;
Link on link, between my wrists,
Now my heavy freedom's hanging.


by Robert Burns

501. The Solemn League and Covenant

 THE SOLEMN League and Covenant
 Now brings a smile, now brings a tear;
But sacred Freedom, too, was theirs:
 If thou’rt a slave, indulge thy sneer


by Robert Burns

406. Lines Inscribed in a Lady’s Pocket Almanack

 GRANT me, indulgent Heaven, that I may live,
To see the miscreants feel the pains they give;
Deal Freedom’s sacred treasures free as air,
Till Slave and Despot be but things that were.


by Alexander Pushkin

A Little Bird

 In alien lands I keep the body
Of ancient native rites and things:
I gladly free a little birdie
At celebration of the spring.
I'm now free for consolation, And thankful to almighty Lord: At least, to one of his creations I've given freedom in this world!


by Les Murray

The Meaning Of Existence

 Everything except language
knows the meaning of existence.
Trees, planets, rivers, time know nothing else.
They express it moment by moment as the universe.
Even this fool of a body lives it in part, and would have full dignity within it but for the ignorant freedom of my talking mind.


by Walt Whitman

To a Certain Cantatrice.

 HERE, take this gift! 
I was reserving it for some hero, speaker, or General, 
One who should serve the good old cause, the great Idea, the progress and freedom of the
 race; 
Some brave confronter of despots—some daring rebel; 
—But I see that what I was reserving, belongs to you just as much as to any.
5


by Walt Whitman

Prairie States The.

 A NEWER garden of creation, no primal solitude, 
Dense, joyous, modern, populous millions, cities and farms, 
With iron interlaced, composite, tied, many in one, 
By all the world contributed—freedom’s and law’s and thrift’s society,

The crown and teeming paradise, so far, of time’s accumulations,
To justify the past.


by Robert Herrick

HOW HIS SOUL CAME ENSNARED

 My soul would one day go and seek
For roses, and in Julia's cheek
A richess of those sweets she found,
As in another Rosamond;
But gathering roses as she was,
Not knowing what would come to pass,
it chanced a ringlet of her hair
Caught my poor soul, as in a snare;
Which ever since has been in thrall;
--Yet freedom she enjoys withal.


by Wang Wei

Answering Vice-Prefect Zhang

 As the years go by, give me but peace, 
Freedom from ten thousand matters.
I ask myself and always answer: What can be better than coming home? A wind from the pine-trees blows my sash, And my lute is bright with the mountain moon.
You ask me about good and evil fortune?.
.
.
.
Hark, on the lake there's a fisherman singing!


by William Henry Davies

Where We Differ

 To think my thoughts are hers, 
Not one of hers is mine; 
She laughs -- while I must sigh; 
She sighs -- while I must whine.
She eats -- while I must fast; She reads -- while I am blind; She sleeps -- while I must wake; Free -- I no freedom find.
To think the world for me Contains but her alone, And that her eyes prefer Some ribbon, scarf, or stone.


by Helen Hunt Jackson

Freedom

 I WILL not follow you, my bird,
 I will not follow you.
I would not breathe a word, my bird, To bring thee here anew.
I love the free in thee, my bird, The lure of freedom drew; The light you fly toward, my bird, I fly with thee unto.
And there we yet will meet, my bird, Though far I go from you Where in the light outpoured, my bird, Are love and freedom too.


by Aleksandr Blok

I Prefer the Gorgeous Freedom

 I prefer the gorgeous freedom,
And I fly to lands of grace,
Where in wide and clear meadows
All is good, as dreams, and blest.
Here they rice: the clover clear, And corn-flower's gentle lace, And the rustle is always here: "Ears are leaning.
.
.
Take your ways!" In this immense sea of fair, Only one of blades reclines.
You don't see in misty air, I'd seen it!It will be mine!


by Delmore Schwartz

Yeats Died Saturday In France

 Yeats died Saturday in France.
Freedom from his animal Has come at last in alien Nice, His heart beat separate from his will: He knows at last the old abyss Which always faced his staring face.
No ability, no dignity Can fail him now who trained so long For the outrage of eternity, Teaching his heart to beat a song In which man's strict humanity, Erect as a soldier, became a tongue.


by The Bible

Galatians 5:1

We have truly been set free
For Christ has redeemed us,
We can walk in His holy power
And know His saving love
May we stand fast in this freedom
Not to be again ensnared
By the heavy yoke we once had borne
When spiritually we were dead
But thanks be to God,
Who has given us the liberty,
Who has resurrected us
To walk in His victory.

Scripture Poem © Copyright Of M.
S.
Lowndes


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Variant Form Of The Preceding Poem

 COME to me, all ye that labour; I will give your spirits rest;
Here apart in starry quiet I will give you rest.
Come to me, ye heavy laden, sin defiled and care opprest, In your father's quiet mansions, soon to prove a welcome guest.
But an hour you bear your trial, sin and suffer, bleed and die; But an hour you toil and combat here in day's inspiring eye.
See the feet of your deliverer; lo, the hour of freedom nigh.


by Robinson Jeffers

Ave Caesar

 No bitterness: our ancestors did it.
They were only ignorant and hopeful, they wanted freedom but wealth too.
Their children will learn to hope for a Caesar.
Or rather--for we are not aquiline Romans but soft mixed colonists-- Some kindly Sicilian tyrant who'll keep Poverty and Carthage off until the Romans arrive, We are easy to manage, a gregarious people, Full of sentiment, clever at mechanics, and we love our luxuries.


by Siegfried Sassoon

Everyone Sang

 Everyone suddenly burst out singing;
And I was filled with such delight
As prisoned birds must find in freedom,
Winging wildly across the white
Orchards and dark-green fields; on--on--and out of sight.
Everyone's voice was suddenly lifted; And beauty came like the setting sun: My heart was shaken with tears; and horror Drifted away .
.
.
O, but Everyone Was a bird; and the song was wordless; the singing will never be done.


by Emily Dickinson

Now I knew I lost her --

 Now I knew I lost her --
Not that she was gone --
But Remoteness travelled
On her Face and Tongue.
Alien, though adjoining As a Foreign Race -- Traversed she though pausing Latitudeless Place.
Elements Unaltered -- Universe the same But Love's transmigration -- Somehow this had come -- Henceforth to remember Nature took the Day I had paid so much for -- His is Penury Not who toils for Freedom Or for Family But the Restitution Of Idolatry.


by Edgar Lee Masters

Marie Bateson

 You observe the carven hand
With the index finger pointing heavenward.
That is the direction, no doubt.
But how shall one follow it? It is well to abstain from murder and lust, To forgive, do good to others, worship God Without graven images.
But these are external means after all By which you chiefly do good to yourself.
The inner kernel is freedom, It is light, purity -- I can no more, Find the goal or lose it, according to your vision.


by Ambrose Bierce

Freedom

 Freedom, as every schoolboy knows,
Once shrieked as Kosciusko fell;
On every wind, indeed, that blows
I hear her yell.
She screams whenever monarchs meet, And parliaments as well, To bind the chains about her feet And toll her knell.
And when the sovereign people cast The votes they cannot spell, Upon the pestilential blast Her clamors swell.
For all to whom the power's given To sway or to compel, Among themselves apportion Heaven And give her Hell.


by Edgar Lee Masters

Roger Heston

 Oh many times did Ernest Hyde and I
Argue about the freedom of the will.
My favorite metaphor was Prickett's cow Roped out to grass, and free you know as far As the length of the rope.
One day while arguing so, watching the cow Pull at the rope to get beyond the circle Which she had eaten bare, Out came the stake, and tossing up her head, She ran for us.
"What's that, free-will or what?" said Ernest, running.
I fell just as she gored me to my death.


by Langston Hughes

Democracy

 Democracy will not come
Today, this year
 Nor ever
Through compromise and fear.
I have as much right As the other fellow has To stand On my two feet And own the land.
I tire so of hearing people say, Let things take their course.
Tomorrow is another day.
I do not need my freedom when I'm dead.
I cannot live on tomorrow's bread.
Freedom Is a strong seed Planted In a great need.
I live here, too.
I want freedom Just as you.


by Nazim Hikmet

Today Is Sunday

 Today is Sunday.
For the first time they took me out into the sun today.
And for the first time in my life I was aghast that the sky is so far away and so blue and so vast I stood there without a motion.
Then I sat on the ground with respectful devotion leaning against the white wall.
Who cares about the waves with which I yearn to roll Or about strife or freedom or my wife right now.
The soil, the sun and me.
.
.
I feel joyful and how.