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Famous Short Eve Poems. Short Eve Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Eve Poems. Short Eve Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Eve short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

 
by Emily Dickinson

She went as quiet as the Dew

 She went as quiet as the Dew
From an Accustomed flower.
Not like the Dew, did she return At the Accustomed hour! She dropt as softly as a star From out my summer's Eve -- Less skillful than Le Verriere It's sorer to believe!


by Robert Herrick

UPON A MAID

 Here she lies, in bed of spice,
Fair as Eve in paradise;
For her beauty, it was such,
Poets could not praise too much.
Virgins come, and in a ring Her supremest REQUIEM sing; Then depart, but see ye tread Lightly, lightly o'er the dead.


by José Martí

Opening the Moorish Grate

Opening the moorish grate
To lean upon the wet sill,
Pale as the moon, and so still, 
A lover ponders his fate.
Pale, beneath her canopy Of red silk and turtledove, Eve, who says nothing of love, A violet plucks in her tea.


by Linda Pastan

Pears

 Some say
it was a pear
Eve ate.
Why else the shape of the womb, or of the cello Whose single song is grief for the parent tree? Why else the fruit itself tawny and sweet which your lover over breakfast lets go your pear- shaped breast to reach for?


by Thomas Edward Brown

My Garden

 A garden is a lovesome thing, God wot!
Rose plot,
Fringed pool,
Ferned grot--
The veriest school
Of peace; and yet the fool
Contends that God is not--
Not God! in gardens! when the eve is cool?
Nay, but I have a sign;
'Tis very sure God walks in mine.


by James Joyce

Bahnhofstrasse

 The eyes that mock me sign the way
Whereto I pass at eve of day.
Grey way whose violet signals are The trysting and the twining star.
Ah star of evil! star of pain! Highhearted youth comes not again Nor old heart's wisdom yet to know The signs that mock me as I go.


by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Theology

 "No, the serpent did not
Seduce Eve to the apple.
All that's simply Corruption of the facts.
Adam ate the apple.
Eve ate Adam.
The serpent ate Eve.
This is the dark intestine.
The serpent, meanwhile, Sleeps his meal off in Paradise - Smiling to hear God's querulous calling.
"


by Thomas Hardy

I Look Into My Glass

 I look into my glass,
And view my wasting skin,
And say, "Would God it came to pass
My heart had shrunk as thin!"

For then, I, undistrest
By hearts grown cold to me,
Could lonely wait my endless rest
With equanimity.
But Time, to make me grieve, Part steals, lets part abide; And shakes this fragile frame at eve With throbbings of noontide.


by A E Housman

From Far From Eve and Morning

 From far, from eve and morning 
And yon twelve-winded sky, 
The stuff of life to knit me 
Blew hither: here am I.
Now-- for a breath I tarry Nor yet disperse apart-- Take my hand quick and tell me, What have you in your heart.
Speak now, and I will answer; How shall I help you, say; Ere to the wind's twelve quarters I take my endless way.


by A E Housman

When the Lad for Longing Sighs

 When the lad for longing sighs, 
Mute and dull of cheer and pale, 
If at death's own door he lies, 
Maiden, you can heal his ail.
Lovers' ills are all to buy: The wan look, the hollow tone, The hung head, the sunken eye, You can have them for your own.
Buy them, buy them: eve and morn Lovers' ills are all to sell.
Then you can lie down forlorn; But the lover will be well.


by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Move Eastward Happy Earth

 Move eastward, happy earth, and leave 
Yon orange sunset waning slow: 
From fringes of the faded eve, 
O, happy planet, eastward go: 
Till over thy dark shoulder glow 
Thy silver sister world, and rise 
To glass herself in dewey eyes 
That watch me from the glen below.
Ah, bear me with thee, lightly borne, Dip forward under starry light, And move me to my marriage-morn, And round again to happy night.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

The Sun Travels

 The sun is not a-bed, when I 
At night upon my pillow lie; 
Still round the earth his way he takes, 
And morning after morning makes.
While here at home, in shining day, We round the sunny garden play, Each little Indian sleepy-head Is being kissed and put to bed.
And when at eve I rise from tea, Day dawns beyond the Atlantic Sea; And all the children in the west Are getting up and being dressed.


by Duncan Campbell Scott

Afterwards

 Her life was touched with early frost,
About the April of her day,
Her hold on earth was lightly lost,
And like a leaf she went away.
Her soul was chartered for great deeds, For gentle war unwonted here: Her spirit sought her clearer needs, An Empyrean atmosphere.
At hush of eve we hear her still Say with her clear, her perfect smile, And with her silver-throated thrill: "A little while - a little while.
"


by Robert Graves

Dead Cow Farm

 An ancient saga tells us how
In the beginning the First Cow 
(For nothing living yet had birth 
But Elemental Cow on earth) 
Began to lick cold stones and mud:
Under her warm tongue flesh and blood 
Blossomed, a miracle to believe: 
And so was Adam born, and Eve.
Here now is chaos once again, Primeval mud, cold stones and rain.
Here flesh decays and blood drips red, And the Cow’s dead, the old Cow’s dead.


by Dorothy Parker

Song Of One Of The Girls

 Here in my heart I am Helen;
I'm Aspasia and Hero, at least.
I'm Judith, and Jael, and Madame de Stael; I'm Salome, moon of the East.
Here in my soul I am Sappho; Lady Hamilton am I, as well.
In me Recamier vies with Kitty O'Shea, With Dido, and Eve, and poor Nell.
I'm of the glamorous ladies At whose beckoning history shook.
But you are a man, and see only my pan, So I stay at home with a book.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

When The Sun Come After Rain

 WHEN the sun comes after rain
And the bird is in the blue,
The girls go down the lane
Two by two.
When the sun comes after shadow And the singing of the showers, The girls go up the meadow, Fair as flowers.
When the eve comes dusky red And the moon succeeds the sun, The girls go home to bed One by one.
And when life draws to its even And the day of man is past, They shall all go home to heaven, Home at last.


by Alfred Lord Tennyson

The Princess: A Medley: As thro the land

 As thro' the land at eve we went,
And pluck'd the ripen'd ears,
We fell out, my wife and I,
O we fell out I know not why,
And kiss'd again with tears.
And blessings on the falling out That all the more endears, When we fall out with those we love And kiss again with tears! For when we came where lies the child We lost in other years, There above the little grave, O there above the little grave, We kiss'd again with tears.


by Robert Browning

In A Gondola

 The moth's kiss, first!
Kiss me as if you made believe
You were not sure, this eve,
How my face, your flower, had pursed
Its petals up; so, here and there
You brush it, till I grow aware
Who wants me, and wide open I burst.
The bee's kiss, now! Kiss me as if you enter'd gay My heart at some noonday, A bud that dares not disallow The claim, so all is rendered up, And passively its shattered cup Over your head to sleep I bow.


by Emma Lazarus

Echoes

 THE MIGHT that shaped itself through storm and stress
In chaos, here is lulled in breathing sweet;
Under the long brown ridge in gentleness
 Its fierce old pulses beat.
Quiet and sad we go at eve; the fire That woke exultant in an earlier day Is dead; the memories of old desire Only in shadows play.
We liken love to this and that; our thought The echo of a deeper being seems: We kiss, because God once for beauty sought Within a world of dreams.