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Famous Short Children Poems. Short Children Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Children Poems. Short Children Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Children short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by Kobayashi Issa

The snow is melting

 The snow is melting
and the village is flooded
with children.


by Kobayashi Issa

Children imitating cormorants

 Children imitating cormorants
are even more wonderful
than cormorants.


by Ogden Nash

The Parent

 Children aren't happy with nothing to ignore,
And that's what parents were created for.


by Walt Whitman

Offerings.

 A THOUSAND perfect men and women appear, 
Around each gathers a cluster of friends, and gay children and youths, with offerings.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

A Thought

 It is very nice to think 
The world is full of meat and drink, 
With little children saying grace 
In every Christian kind of place.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

To Auntie

 "Chief of our aunts"--not only I, 
But all your dozen of nurselings cry-- 
"What did the other children do? 
And what were childhood, wanting you?"


by Stephen Crane

Tradition thou art for suckling children

 Tradition, thou art for suckling children,
Thou art the enlivening milk for babes;
But no meat for men is in thee.
Then --
But, alas, we all are babes.


by Carl Sandburg

Cartoon

 I AM making a Cartoon of a Woman. She is the People.
 She is the Great Dirty Mother.
And Many Children hang on her Apron, crawl at her
 Feet, snuggle at her Breasts.


by Edward Lear

There was an Old Man of the East

There was an Old Man of the East,
Who gave all his children a feast;
But they all ate so much, and their conduct was such,
That it killed that Old Man of the East.


by Mother Goose

Ladybird


Ladybird, ladybird, fly away home!
Your house is on fire, your children all gone,
All but one, and her name is Ann,
And she crept under the pudding pan.


by Edward Lear

There was an Old Person of Chester

There was an Old Person of Chester,
Whom several small children did pester;
They threw some large stones, which broke most of his bones,
And displeased that Old Person of Chester.


by Carl Sandburg

Clinton South of Polk

 I WANDER down on Clinton street south of Polk
And listen to the voices of Italian children quarreling.
It is a cataract of coloratura
And I could sleep to their musical threats and accusations.


by Mother Goose

Bedtime

 

The Man in the Moon looked out of the moon,
  Looked out of the moon and said,
"'Tis time for all children, on the earth
  To think about getting to bed!"


by Emily Dickinson

Contained in this short Life

 Contained in this short Life
Are magical extents
The soul returning soft at night
To steal securer thence

As Children strictest kept
Turn soonest to the sea
Whose nameless Fathoms slink away
Beside infinity


by Mother Goose

There Was An Old Woman


There was an old woman who lived in a shoe.
She had so many children she didn't know what to do.
She gave them some broth without any bread.
She whipped them all soundly and put them to bed.


by Mother Goose

Wee Willie Winkie

 

Wee Willie Winkie runs through the town,
Upstairs and downstairs, in his nightgown;
Rapping at the window, crying through the lock,
"Are the children in their beds? Now it's eight o'clock."


by Emily Dickinson

Away from Home are some and I --

 Away from Home are some and I --
An Emigrant to be
In a Metropolis of Homes
Is easy, possibly --

The Habit of a Foreign Sky
We -- difficult -- acquire
As Children, who remain in Face
The more their Feet retire.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Fairy Bread

 Come up here, O dusty feet!
Here is fairy ready to eat.
Here in my retiring room,
Children ,you may dine
On the golden smell of broom
And the shade of pine;
And when you have eaten well,
Fairy stories hear and tell.


by Carl Sandburg

Five Cent Balloons

 PIETRO has twenty red and blue balloons on a string.
They flutter and dance pulling Pietro’s arm.
A nickel apiece is what they sell for.

Wishing children tag Pietro’s heels.

He sells out and goes the streets alone.


by Emily Dickinson

The Mountain sat upon the Plain

 The Mountain sat upon the Plain
In his tremendous Chair --
His observation omnifold,
His inquest, everywhere --

The Seasons played around his knees
Like Children round a sire --
Grandfather of the Days is He
Of Dawn, the Ancestor --


by Emily Dickinson

New feet within my garden go

 New feet within my garden go --
New fingers stir the sod --
A Troubadour upon the Elm
Betrays the solitude.

New children play upon the green --
New Weary sleep below --
And still the pensive Spring returns --
And still the punctual snow!


by Mother Goose

The Old Woman From France


There came an old woman from France
Who taught grown-up children to dance;
    But they were so stiff,
    She sent them home in a sniff,
This sprightly old woman from France.


by Mother Goose

The Old Woman Of Surrey

 

There was an old woman in Surrey,
Who was morn, noon, and night in a hurry;
    Called her husband a fool,
    Drove the children to school,
The worrying old woman of Surrey.


by Emily Dickinson

Tell all the Truth but tell it slant --

 Tell all the Truth but tell it slant --
Success in Circuit lies
Too bright for our infirm Delight
The Truth's superb surprise

As Lightning to the Children eased
With explanation kind
The Truth must dazzle gradually
Or every man be blind --


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Singing

 Of speckled eggs the birdie sings 
And nests among the trees; 
The sailor sings of ropes and things 
In ships upon the seas. 

The children sing in far Japan, 
The children sing in Spain; 
The organ with the organ man 
Is singing in the rain.


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