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Famous Short Change Poems. Short Change Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Change Poems. Short Change Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Change short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by William Morris

Summer

 Summer looked for long am I:
Much shall change or e'er I die.
Prithee take it not amiss
Though I weary thee with bliss.


by Robert Burns

53. Lines on the Author’s Death

 HE who of Rankine sang, lies stiff and dead,
And a green grassy hillock hides his head;
Alas! alas! a devilish change indeed.


by Ogura Hyakunin Isshu

Kawara no Sadaijin

Michinoku print
Of shinobu's tangled leaves!
For whose sake have I,
Like confused, begun to be?
Only yours! I can not change!


by Robert Herrick

WHY FLOWERS CHANGE COLOUR

 These fresh beauties, we can prove,
Once were virgins, sick of love,
Turn'd to flowers: still in some,
Colours go and colours come.


by Robert Frost

Dust of Snow

 The way a crow
Shook down on me
The dust of snow
From a hemlock tree
Has given my heart
A change of mood
And saved some part
Of a day I had rued.


by Wang Wei

A Song of an Autumn Night.

 Under the crescent moon a light autumn dew 
Has chilled the robe she will not change -- 
And she touches a silver lute all night, 
Afraid to go back to her empty room.


by Sara Teasdale

It Will Not Change

 It will not change now
After so many years;
Life has not broken it
With parting or tears;
Death will not alter it,
It will live on
In all my songs for you
When I am gone.


by Emily Dickinson

Me change! Me alter!

 Me, change! Me, alter!
Then I will, when on the Everlasting Hill
A Smaller Purple grows --
At sunset, or a lesser glow
Flickers upon Cordillera --
At Day's superior close!


by Arthur Hugh Clough

With Whom is no Variableness Neither Shadow of Turning

 It fortifies my soul to know
That, though I perish, Truth is so:
That, howsoe'er I stray and range,
Whate'er I do, Thou dost not change.
I steadier step when I recall
That, if I slip, Thou dost not fall.


by Mark Van Doren

Nothing Stays

 Nothing stays
not even change,
That can grow tired 
of it's own name;
The very thought
too much for it.

Somewhere in air
a stillness is, 
So far, so thin-
But let it alone.
Whoever we are
it is not for us


by Sara Teasdale

Like Barley Bending

 Like barley bending
In low fields by the sea,
Singing in hard wind
Ceaselessly;

Like barley bending
And rising again,
So would I, unbroken,
Rise from pain;

So would I softly,
Day long, night long,
Change my sorrow
Into song.


by Emily Dickinson

The Thrill came slowly like a Boom for

 The Thrill came slowly like a Boom for
Centuries delayed
Its fitness growing like the Flood
In sumptuous solitude --
The desolations only missed
While Rapture changed its Dress
And stood amazed before the Change
In ravished Holiness --


by Thomas Hardy

Waiting Both

 A star looks down at me, 
And says: "Here I and you
Stand each in our degree: 
What do you mean to do,—

 Mean to do?"

I say: "For all I know,
Wait, and let Time go by,
Till my change come."—"Just so,"
The star says: "So mean I:—
 So mean I."


by Emily Dickinson

All but Death can be Adjusted --

 All but Death, can be Adjusted --
Dynasties repaired --
Systems -- settled in their Sockets --
Citadels -- dissolved --

Wastes of Lives -- resown with Colors
By Succeeding Springs --
Death -- unto itself -- Exception --
Is exempt from Change --


by Amy Levy

Impotens

 If I were a woman of old,
What prayers I would pray for you, dear;
My pitiful tribute behold--
Not a prayer, but a tear.

The pitiless order of things,
Whose laws we may change not nor break,
Alone I could face it--it wrings
My heart for your sake.


by Emily Dickinson

My country need not change her gown

 My country need not change her gown,
Her triple suit as sweet
As when 'twas cut at Lexington,
And first pronounced "a fit."

Great Britain disapproves, "the stars";
Disparagement discreet, --
There's something in their attitude
That taunts her bayonet.


by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Old

 I have seen peoples come and go 
Alike the Ocean'd ebb and flow; 
I have seen kingdoms rise and fall 
Like springtime shadows on a wall. 
I have seen houses rendered great 
That grew from life's debased estate, 
And all, all, all is change I see, 
So, dearest God, take me, take me.


by Emily Dickinson

To the bright east she flies

 To the bright east she flies,
Brothers of Paradise
Remit her home,
Without a change of wings,
Or Love's convenient things,
Enticed to come.

Fashioning what she is,
Fathoming what she was,
We deem we dream --
And that dissolves the days
Through which existence strays
Homeless at home.


by Sylvia Plath

Full Fathom Five

 Full fathom five thy father lies; 
Of his bones are coral made; 
Those are pearls that were his eyes: 
Nothing of him that doth fade 
But doth suffer a sea-change 
Into something rich and strange. 
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: 
Ding-dong. 
Hark! now I hear them,--ding-dong, bell.


by William Shakespeare

Fairy Land v

 FULL fathom five thy father lies; 
Of his bones are coral made; 
Those are pearls that were his eyes: 
 Nothing of him that doth fade, 
But doth suffer a sea-change 
Into something rich and strange. 
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell: 
 Ding-dong. 
 Hark! now I hear them-- 
 Ding-dong, bell!


by Carl Sandburg

Kin

 BROTHER, I am fire
Surging under the ocean floor.
I shall never meet you, brother--
Not for years, anyhow;
Maybe thousands of years, brother.
Then I will warm you,
Hold you close, wrap you in circles,
Use you and change you--
Maybe thousands of years, brother.
Where the moon slants and wavers.


by Howard Nemerov

The Beautiful Lawn Sprinkler

 What gives it power makes it change its mind
At each extreme, and lean its rising rain
Down low, first one and then the other way;
In which exchange humility and pride
Reverse, forgive, arise, and die again,
Wherefore it holds at both ends of the day
The rainbow in its scattering grains of spray.


by William Butler Yeats

His Bargain

 Who talks of Plato's spindle;
What set it whirling round?
Eternity may dwindle,
Time is unwound,
Dan and Jerry Lout
Change their loves about.
However they may take it,
Before the thread began
I made, and may not break it
When the last thread has run,
A bargain with that hair
And all the windings there.


by William Blake

To The Accuser Who is The God of This World

 Truly My Satan thou art but a Dunce
And dost not know the Garment from the Man
Every Harlot was a Virgin once
Nor canst thou ever change Kate into Nan

Tho thou art Worship'd by the Names Divine 
Of Jesus & Jehovah thou art still
The Son of Morn in weary Nights decline
The lost Travellers Dream under the Hill


by Walt Whitman

Year that Trembled.

 YEAR that trembled and reel’d beneath me! 
Your summer wind was warm enough—yet the air I breathed froze me; 
A thick gloom fell through the sunshine and darken’d me; 
Must I change my triumphant songs? said I to myself; 
Must I indeed learn to chant the cold dirges of the baffled?
And sullen hymns of defeat?


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