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Famous Short Art Poems. Short Art Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Art Poems. Short Art Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Art short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by Kobayashi Issa

Writing shit about new snow

 Writing shit about new snow
for the rich
is not art.


by Mother Goose

Caesar's Song

 

  Bow-wow-wow!
Whose dog art thou?
Little Tom Tinker's dog,
  Bow-wow-wow!


by Emily Dickinson

Her Grace is all she has --

 Her Grace is all she has --
And that, so least displays --
One Art to recognize, must be,
Another Art, to praise.


by Dorothy Parker

Faute De Mieux

 Travel, trouble, music, art,
A kiss, a frock, a rhyme-
I never said they feed my heart,
But still they pass my time.


by Robert Burns

506. Epigram on Mr. James Gracie

 GRACIE, thou art a man of worth,
 O be thou Dean for ever!
May he be d—d to hell henceforth,
 Who fauts thy weight or measure!


by Robert Burns

121. Epitaph on “Wee Johnnie”

 WHOE’ER thou art, O reader, know
 That Death has murder’d Johnie;
An’ here his body lies fu’ low;
 For saul he ne’er had ony.


by Robert Burns

175. Epigram to Miss Jean Scott

 O HAD each Scot of ancient times
 Been, Jeanie Scott, as thou art;
The bravest heart on English ground
 Had yielded like a coward.


by Paul Laurence Dunbar

Distinction

 "I am but clay," the sinner plead, 
Who fed each vain desire.
"Not only clay," another said, "But worse, for thou art mire.
"


by Ben Jonson

To Pertinax Cob


LXIX.
 — TO PERTINAX COB.

COB, thou nor soldier, thief, nor fencer art,
Yet by thy weapon liv'st! thou hast one good part.


by Robert Herrick

UPON MAN

 Man is composed here of a twofold part;
The first of nature, and the next of art;
Art presupposes nature; nature, she
Prepares the way for man's docility.


by Stephen Crane

Tradition thou art for suckling children

 Tradition, thou art for suckling children,
Thou art the enlivening milk for babes;
But no meat for men is in thee.
Then -- But, alas, we all are babes.


by Emily Dickinson

Tomorrow -- whose location

 "Tomorrow" -- whose location
The Wise deceives
Though its hallucination
Is last that leaves --
Tomorrow -- thou Retriever
Of every tare --
Of Alibi art thou
Or ownest where?


by Walter Savage Landor

On His Seventy-fifth Birthday

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife;
Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art;
I warmed both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by Walter Savage Landor

Dying Speech of an Old Philosopher

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife:
Nature I loved, and, next to Nature, Art:
I warm'd both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks; and I am ready to depart.


by Stephen Crane

Charity thou art a lie

 Charity thou art a lie,
A toy of women,
A pleasure of certain men.
In the presence of justice, Lo, the walls of the temple Are visible Through thy form of sudden shadows.


by Walter Savage Landor

I Strove with None

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife.
Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by Walter Savage Landor

Finis

 I STROVE with none, for none was worth my strife.
Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by William Blake

The Sick Rose

 O Rose thou art sick.
The invisible worm.
That flies in the night In the howling storm: Has found out thy bed Of crimson joy: And his dark secret love Does thy life destroy.


by Robert Burns

472. To the beautiful Miss Eliza J——n on her principles of Liberty and Eqality

 HOW, Liberty! girl, can it be by thee nam’d?
Equality too! hussey, art not asham’d?
Free and Equal indeed, while mankind thou enchainest,
And over their hearts a proud Despot so reignest.


by Robert Burns

124. Motto prefixed to the Author’s first Publication

 THE SIMPLE Bard, unbroke by rules of art,
He pours the wild effusions of the heart;
And if inspir’d ’tis Nature’s pow’rs inspire;
Her’s all the melting thrill, and her’s the kindling fire.


by Walt Whitman

Hast Never Come to Thee an Hour.

 HAST never come to thee an hour, 
A sudden gleam divine, precipitating, bursting all these bubbles, fashions, wealth? 
These eager business aims—books, politics, art, amours, 
To utter nothingness?


by Emily Dickinson

To own the Art within the Soul

 To own the Art within the Soul
The Soul to entertain
With Silence as a Company
And Festival maintain

Is an unfurnished Circumstance
Possession is to One
As an Estate perpetual
Or a reduceless Mine.


by Emily Dickinson

Oh Shadow on the Grass

 Oh Shadow on the Grass,
Art thou a Step or not?
Go make thee fair my Candidate
My nominated Heart --
Oh Shadow on the Grass
While I delay to guess
Some other thou wilt consecrate --
Oh Unelected Face --


by Emily Dickinson

Extol thee -- could I? Then I will

 Extol thee -- could I? Then I will
By saying nothing new --
But just the truest truth
That thou art heavenly.
Perceiving thee is evidence That we are of the sky Partaking thee a guaranty Of immortality


by Stephen Crane

Mystic shadow bending near me

 Mystic shadow, bending near me,
Who art thou?
Whence come ye?
And -- tell me -- is it fair
Or is the truth bitter as eaten fire?

Tell me!
Fear not that I should quaver.
For I dare -- I dare.
Then, tell me!


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