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Famous Short Star Poems. Short Star Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Star Poems. Short Star Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Star short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by W S Merwin

Wish

 The star in my
Hand is falling

All the uniforms know what's no use

May I bow to Necessity not
To her hirelings


by Emily Dickinson

No matter where the Saints abide

 No matter where the Saints abide,
They make their Circuit fair
Behold how great a Firmament
Accompanies a Star.


by Emily Dickinson

These are the days that Reindeer love

 These are the days that Reindeer love
And pranks the Northern star --
This is the Sun's objective,
And Finland of the Year.


by William Strode

On His Lady Marie

 Marie, Incarnate Virtue, Soule and Skin
Both pure, whom Death not Life convincd of Sin,
Had Daughters like seven Pleiades; but She
Was a prime Star of greatest Claritie.


by Emily Dickinson

All I may if small

 All I may, if small,
Do it not display
Larger for the Totalness --
'Tis Economy

To bestow a World
And withhold a Star --
Utmost, is Munificence --
Less, tho' larger, poor.


by Emily Dickinson

At last to be identified!

 At last, to be identified!
At last, the lamps upon thy side
The rest of Life to see!

Past Midnight! Past the Morning Star!
Past Sunrise!
Ah, What leagues there were
Between our feet, and Day!


by William Allingham

An Evening

 A sunset's mounded cloud; 
A diamond evening-star; 
Sad blue hills afar; 
Love in his shroud.
Scarcely a tear to shed; Hardly a word to say; The end of a summer day; Sweet Love dead.


by Emily Dickinson

Whoever disenchants

 Whoever disenchants
A single Human soul
By failure of irreverence
Is guilty of the whole.
As guileless as a Bird As graphic as a star Till the suggestion sinister Things are not what they are --


by Emily Dickinson

Who abdicated Ambush

 Who abdicated Ambush
And went the way of Dusk,
And now against his subtle Name
There stands an Asterisk
As confident of him as we --
Impregnable we are --
The whole of Immortality
Secreted in a Star.


by Emily Dickinson

Lightly stepped a yellow star

 Lightly stepped a yellow star
To its lofty place --
Loosed the Moon her silver hat
From her lustral Face --
All of Evening softly lit
As an Astral Hall --
Father, I observed to Heaven,
You are punctual.


by Emily Dickinson

Our share of night to bear

 Our share of night to bear --
Our share of morning --
Our blank in bliss to fill
Our blank in scorning --

Here a star, and there a star,
Some lose their way!
Here a mist, and there a mist,
Afterwards -- Day!


by Emily Dickinson

He lived the Life of Ambush

 He lived the Life of Ambush
And went the way of Dusk
And now against his subtle name
There stands an Asterisk
As confident of him as we --
Impregnable we are --
The whole of Immortality intrenched
Within a star --


by A E Housman

Stars

 Stars, I have seen them fall,
But when they drop and die
No star is lost at all
From all the star-sown sky.
The toil of all that be Helps not the primal fault; It rains into the sea, And still the sea is salt.


by Emily Dickinson

The Moon upon her fluent Route

 The Moon upon her fluent Route
Defiant of a Road --
The Star's Etruscan Argument
Substantiate a God --

If Aims impel these Astral Ones
The ones allowed to know
Know that which makes them as forgot
As Dawn forgets them -- now --


by Emily Dickinson

She went as quiet as the Dew

 She went as quiet as the Dew
From an Accustomed flower.
Not like the Dew, did she return At the Accustomed hour! She dropt as softly as a star From out my summer's Eve -- Less skillful than Le Verriere It's sorer to believe!


by George William Russell

The Voice of the Sea

 THE SEA was hoary, hoary,
Beating on rock and cave:
The winds were white and weeping
With foam dust of the wave.
They thundered louder, louder, With storm-lips curled in scorn— And dost thou tremble before us, O fallen star of morn?


by Carl Sandburg

Baby Toes

 THERE is a blue star, Janet,
Fifteen years’ ride from us,
If we ride a hundred miles an hour.
There is a white star, Janet, Forty years’ ride from us, If we ride a hundred miles an hour.
Shall we ride To the blue star Or the white star?


by Emily Dickinson

The Road was lit with Moon and star --

 The Road was lit with Moon and star --
The Trees were bright and still --
Descried I -- by the distant Light
A Traveller on a Hill --
To magic Perpendiculars
Ascending, though Terrene --
Unknown his shimmering ultimate --
But he indorsed the sheen --


by Thomas Hardy

Waiting Both

 A star looks down at me, 
And says: "Here I and you
Stand each in our degree: 
What do you mean to do,—

 Mean to do?"

I say: "For all I know,
Wait, and let Time go by,
Till my change come.
"—"Just so," The star says: "So mean I:— So mean I.
"


by Carl Sandburg

Valley Song

 THE SUNSET swept
To the valley’s west, you remember.
The frost was on.
A star burnt blue.
We were warm, you remember, And counted the rings on a moon.
The sunset swept To the valley’s west And was gone in a big dark door of stars.


by Li Po

Gazing at the Cascade on Lu Mountain

 Where crowns a purple haze
Ashimmer in sunlight rays
The hill called Incense-Burner Peak, from far
To see, hung o'er the torrent's wall,
That waterfall
Vault sheer three thousand feet, you'd say
The Milky Way
Was tumbling from the high heavens, star on star


by Walter Savage Landor

Do you Remember me? or are you Proud?

 "Do you remember me? or are you proud?"
Lightly advancing thro' her star-trimm'd crowd,
Ianthe said, and lookt into my eyes,
"A yes, a yes, to both: for Memory
Where you but once have been must ever be,
And at your voice Pride from his throne must rise.
"


by Emily Dickinson

This heart that broke so long

 This heart that broke so long --
These feet that never flagged --
This faith that watched for star in vain,
Give gently to the dead --

Hound cannot overtake the Hare
That fluttered panting, here --
Nor any schoolboy rob the nest
Tenderness builded there.


by Walter Savage Landor

Ianthes Question

 ‘Do you remember me? or are you proud?’
Lightly advancing thro’ her star-trimm’d crowd,
Ianthe said, and look’d into my eyes.
‘A yes, a yes to both: for Memory Where you but once have been must ever be, And at your voice Pride from his throne must rise.


by Ben Jonson

On Cheveril


LIV.
 — ON CHEVERIL.
  [II]

CHEVERIL cries out my verses libels are ;
And threatens the Star-chamber, and the Bar.
What are thy petulant pleadings, CHEVERIL, then,
That quit'st the cause so oft, and rail'st at men ?


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