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Short Poetry by Popular Famous Poets

 Poet
1 William Wordsworth
2 Emily Dickinson
3 William Shakespeare
4 Maya Angelou
5 Langston Hughes
6 Robert Frost
7 Walt Whitman
8 Rabindranath Tagore
9 Shel Silverstein
10 William Blake
11 Pablo Neruda
12 Sylvia Plath
13 Edward Estlin (E E) Cummings
14 William Butler Yeats
15 Tupac Shakur
16 Oscar Wilde
17 Rudyard Kipling
18 Sandra Cisneros
19 Alfred Lord Tennyson
20 Alice Walker
21 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
22 Billy Collins
23 Christina Rossetti
24 Carol Ann Duffy
25 Charles Bukowski
26 Edgar Allan Poe
27 Sarojini Naidu
28 John Donne
29 Ralph Waldo Emerson
30 Nikki Giovanni
31 John Keats
32 Raymond Carver
33 Mark Twain
34 Thomas Hardy
35 Anne Sexton
36 Lewis Carroll
37 Elizabeth Barrett Browning
38 Gary Soto
39 Carl Sandburg
40 Alexander Pushkin
41 Gwendolyn Brooks
42 Henry David Thoreau
43 George (Lord) Byron
44 Spike Milligan
45 Margaret Atwood
46 Muhammad Ali
47 Roger McGough
48 Sara Teasdale
49 Jane Austen
50 Allen Ginsberg
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Famous Short Nature Poems

Famous Short Nature Poems. Short Nature Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Nature short poems

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Nature | Short Famous Poems and Poets

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by Robert Herrick

AMBITION

 In man, ambition is the common'st thing;
Each one by nature loves to be a king.


by Robert Herrick

BURIAL

 Man may want land to live in; but for all
Nature finds out some place for burial.


by Emily Dickinson

Her sovereign People

 Her sovereign People
Nature knows as well
And is as fond of signifying
As if fallible --


by Emily Dickinson

Of Nature I shall have enough

 Of Nature I shall have enough
When I have entered these
Entitled to a Bumble bee's
Familiarities.


by Emily Dickinson

Nature assigns the Sun --

 Nature assigns the Sun --
That -- is Astronomy --
Nature cannot enact a Friend --
That -- is Astrology.


by Emily Dickinson

I bet with every Wind that blew

 I bet with every Wind that blew
Till Nature in chagrin
Employed a Fact to visit me
And scuttle my Balloon --


by Emily Dickinson

As willing lid oer weary eye

 As willing lid o'er weary eye
The Evening on the Day leans
Till of all our nature's House
Remains but Balcony


by Thomas Hardy

Cardinal Bembos Epitaph on Raphael

 Here's one in whom Nature feared--faint at such vying - 
Eclipse while he lived, and decease at his dying.


by Emily Dickinson

If Nature smiles -- the Mother must

 If Nature smiles -- the Mother must
I'm sure, at many a whim
Of Her eccentric Family --
Is She so much to blame?


by Emily Dickinson

Betrothed to Righteousness might be

 Betrothed to Righteousness might be
An Ecstasy discreet
But Nature relishes the Pinks
Which she was taught to eat --


by Emily Dickinson

Touch lightly Natures sweet Guitar

 Touch lightly Nature's sweet Guitar
Unless thou know'st the Tune
Or every Bird will point at thee
Because a Bard too soon --


by Emily Dickinson

Declaiming Waters none may dread --

 Declaiming Waters none may dread --
But Waters that are still
Are so for that most fatal cause
In Nature -- they are full --


by Emily Dickinson

There is no Silence in the Earth -- so silent

 There is no Silence in the Earth -- so silent
As that endured
Which uttered, would discourage Nature
And haunt the World.


by Emily Dickinson

Rest at Night

 Rest at Night
The Sun from shining,
Nature -- and some Men --
Rest at Noon -- some Men --
While Nature
And the Sun -- go on --


by Emily Dickinson

Look back on Time with kindly eyes --

 Look back on Time, with kindly eyes --
He doubtless did his best --
How softly sinks that trembling sun
In Human Nature's West --


by Aleister Crowley

Optimist

 Kill off mankind,
And give the Earth a chance!
Nature might find
In her inheritance
The seedlings of a race
Less infinitely base.


by Emily Dickinson

The worthlessness of Earthly things

 The worthlessness of Earthly things
The Ditty is that Nature Sings --
And then -- enforces their delight
Till Synods are inordinate --


by Robert Burns

205. Song—Go on Sweet Bird and Soothe my Care

 FOR thee is laughing Nature gay,
For thee she pours the vernal day;
For me in vain is Nature drest,
While Joy’s a stranger to my breast.


by Robert Burns

457. Epitaph on Wm. Graham Esq. of Mossknowe

 “STOP thief!” dame Nature call’d to Death,
As Willy drew his latest breath;
How shall I make a fool again?
My choicest model thou hast ta’en.


by Robert Herrick

UPON MAN

 Man is composed here of a twofold part;
The first of nature, and the next of art;
Art presupposes nature; nature, she
Prepares the way for man's docility.


by Emily Dickinson

Peril as a Possesssion

 Peril as a Possesssion
'Tis Good to hear
Danger disintegrates Satiety
There's Basis there --
Begets an awe
That searches Human Nature's creases
As clean as Fire.


by Walter Savage Landor

On His Seventy-fifth Birthday

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife;
Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art;
I warmed both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by Emily Dickinson

A Moth the hue of this

 A Moth the hue of this
Haunts Candles in Brazil.
Nature's Experience would make Our Reddest Second pale.
Nature is fond, I sometimes think, Of Trinkets, as a Girl.


by Walter Savage Landor

Dying Speech of an Old Philosopher

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife:
Nature I loved, and, next to Nature, Art:
I warm'd both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks; and I am ready to depart.


by Walt Whitman

Gliding Over All

 GLIDING o’er all, through all, 
Through Nature, Time, and Space, 
As a ship on the waters advancing, 
The voyage of the soul—not life alone, 
Death, many deaths I’ll sing.
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