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Famous Short Lonely Poems. Short Lonely Poetry by Famous Poets

Famous Short Lonely Poems. Short Lonely Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Lonely short poems

See also: Best Famous Short Poems | Short Member Poems | Best Short Member Poems | Top 100 Famous Short Poems

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by Richard Wilbur

Having Misidentified A Wildflower

 A thrush, because I'd been wrong,
Burst rightly into song
In a world not vague, not lonely,
Not governed by me only.


by Robert Louis Stevenson

At Last She Comes

 AT last she comes, O never more
In this dear patience of my pain
To leave me lonely as before,
Or leave my soul alone again.


by Robert Herrick

Departure of the Good Daemon

 What can I do in poetry,
Now the good spirit's gone from me?
Why, nothing now but lonely sit
And over-read what I have writ.


by Li Po

Alone Looking at the Mountain

 All the birds have flown up and gone;
A lonely cloud floats leisurely by.
We never tire of looking at each other - Only the mountain and I.


by Ogura Hyakunin Isshu

Sarumaru Tayu

In the mountain depths,
Treading through the crimson leaves,
Cries the wandering stag.
When I hear the lonely cry, Sad,--how sad--the autumn is!


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Soon Our Friends Perish

 SOON our friends perish,
Soon all we cherish
Fades as days darken - goes as flowers go.
Soon in December Over an ember, Lonely we hearken, as loud winds blow.


by Hilaire Belloc

The Telephone

 To-night in million-voiced London I 
Was lonely as the million-pointed sky 
Until your single voice.
Ah! So the sun Peoples all heaven, although he be but one.


by Rg Gregory

grandeur

 loneliness is a state
the lonely cannot reach

it carries a grandeur
that doesn't fit into

bed-sitters or rejected
ideas - it's the label stuck

on the bottle after
the tables have gone


by Alfred Lord Tennyson

The Eagle

 He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.
The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; He watches from his mountain walls, And like a thunderbolt he falls.


by Li Po

Farewell to Meng Hao-jan

 I took leave of you, old friend, at the 
Yellow Crane Pavilion; 
In the mist and bloom of March, you went 
down to Yang-chou: 
A lonely sail, distant shades, extinguished by blue-- 
There, at the horizon, where river meets sky.


by Wang Wei

Farewell to Hsin Chien at Hibiscus Pavilion

 A cold rain mingled with the river
at evening, when I entered Wu;
In the clear dawn I bid you farewell,
lonely as Ch'u Mountain.
My kinsfolk in Loyang, should they ask about me, Tell them: "My heart is a piece of ice in a jade cup!"


by John Montague

Blessing

 A feel of warmth in this place.
In winter air, a scent of harvest.
No form of prayer is needed, When by sudden grace attended.
Naturally, we fall from grace.
Mere humans, we forget what light Led us, lonely, to this place.


by William Carlos (WCW) Williams

Muier

 Oh, black Persian cat! 
Was not your life 
already cursed with offspring? 
We took you for rest to that old 
Yankee farm,—so lonely 
and with so many field mice 
in the long grass—
and you return to us 
in this condition—! 

Oh, black Persian cat.


by William Blake

The Little Boy Found

 The little boy lost in the lonely fen,
Led by the wand'ring light,
Began to cry, but God ever nigh,
Appeared like his father in white.
He kissed the child & by the hand led And to his mother brought, Who in sorrow pale.
thro' the lonely dale Her little boy weeping sought.


by Dejan Stojanovic

A New Friend

Tell me something less significant, 
Something about our biology, for instance, 
About what you hear while sitting under the tree, 
About lonely lions in the prairies; 
Forget decorated generals; 
Tell me about Private Ryan, 
Tell me something only you know
And make a new friend.


by Dame Edith Sitwell

Bells Of Gray Crystal

 Bells of gray crystal
Break on each bough--
The swans' breath will mist all
The cold airs now.
Like tall pagodas Two people go, Trail their long codas Of talk through the snow.
Lonely are these And lonely and I .
.
.
.
The clouds, gray Chinese geese Sleek through the sky.


by Dame Edith Sitwell

Bells Of Gray Crystal

 Bells of gray crystal
Break on each bough--
The swans' breath will mist all
The cold airs now.
Like tall pagodas Two people go, Trail their long codas Of talk through the snow.
Lonely are these And lonely and I .
.
.
.
The clouds, gray Chinese geese Sleek through the sky.


by Georg Trakl

Klage

 Dreamless sleep - the dusky Eagles
nightlong rush about my head,
man's golden image drowned
in timeless icy tides.
On jagged reefs his purpling body.
Dark echoes sound above the seas.
Stormy sadness' sister, see our lonely skiff sunk down by starry skies: the silent face of night.


by A E Housman

The Stinging Nettle

 The stinging nettle only
Will still be found to stand:
The numberless, the lonely,
The thronger of the land,
The leaf that hurts the hand.
That thrives, come sun, come showers; Blow east, blow west, it springs; It peoples towns, and towers Above the courts of Kings, And touch it and it stings.


by Stephen Crane

In a lonely place

 In a lonely place,
I encountered a sage
Who sat, all still,
Regarding a newspaper.
He accosted me: "Sir, what is this?" Then I saw that I was greater, Aye, greater than this sage.
I answered him at once, "Old, old man, it is the wisdom of the age.
" The sage looked upon me with admiration.


by Emily Bronte

The Sun Has Set

 The sun has set, and the long grass now 
Waves dreamily in the evening wind; 
And the wild bird has flown from that old gray stone 
In some warm nook a couch to find.
In all the lonely landscape round I see no light and hear no sound, Except the wind that far away Come sighing o'er the healthy sea.


by Thomas Hardy

The Fallow Deer At The Lonely House

 One without looks in tonight
Through the curtain-chink
From the sheet of glistening white;
One without looks in tonight
As we sit and think 
By the fender-brink.
We do not discern those eyes Watching in the snow; Lit by lamps of rosy dyes We do not discern those eyes Wandering, aglow Four-footed, tiptoe.


by William Butler Yeats

To His Heart Bidding It Have No Fear

 Be you still, be you still, trembling heart;
Remember the wisdom out of the old days:
Him who trembles before the flame and the flood,
And the winds that blow through the starry ways,
Let the starry winds and the flame and the flood
Cover over and hide, for he has no part
With the lonely, majestical multitude.


by Sara Teasdale

I Remembered

 There never was a mood of mine,
Gay or heart-broken, luminous or dull,
But you could ease me of its fever
And give it back to me more beutiful.
In many another soul I broke the bread, And drank the wine and played the happy guest, But I was lonely, I remembered you; The heart belong to him who knew it best.


by Anne Bronte

Appeal

 Oh, I am very weary,
Though tears no longer flow;
My eyes are tires of weeping,
My heart is sick of woe;

My life is very lonely,
My days pass heavily,
I'm wearing of repining,
Wilt thou not come to me?

Oh, didst thou know my longings
For thee, from day to day,
My hopes, so often blighted,
Thou wouldst not thus delay!


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