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Famous Short Age Poems

Famous Short Age Poems. Short Age Poetry by Famous Poets. A collection of the all-time best Age short poems

Other Short Poem Pages

More great short poems below.

Age | Short Famous Poems and Poets

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by Ogden Nash

Crossing The Border

 Senescence begins
And middle age ends
The day your descendents
Outnumber your friends.


by Robert Herrick

THE PRESENT TIME BEST PLEASETH

 Praise, they that will, times past: I joy to see
Myself now live; this age best pleaseth me!


by Walt Whitman

To Old Age.

 I SEE in you the estuary that enlarges and spreads itself grandly as it pours in the great
 Sea.


by Friedrich von Schiller

The Present Generation

 Was it always as now? This race I truly can't fathom.
Nothing is young but old age; youth, alas! only is old.


by Walter Savage Landor

One Lovely Name

 One lovely name adorns my song, 
And, dwelling in the heart, 
Forever falters at the tongue, 
And trembles to depart.


by Walter Savage Landor

Dirce

 Stand close around, ye Stygian set,
With Dirce in one boat conveyed,
Or Charon, seeing, may forget
That he is old and she a shade.


by Walter Savage Landor

Soon O Ianthe! life is oer

 Soon, O Ianthe! life is o'er,
And sooner beauty's heavenly smile:
Grant only (and I ask no more),
Let love remain that little while.


by Walter Savage Landor

Death Stands Above Me Whispering Low

 Death stands above me, whispering low 
I know not what into my ear:
Of his strange language all I know 
Is, there is not a word of fear.


by Peter Huchel

Answer

 Sound, sound the clarion, fill the fife!
To all the sensual world proclaim,
One crowded hour of glorious life
Is worth an age without a name.


by Sir Walter Scott

Sound Sound the Clarion

 Sound, sound the clarion, fill the fife!
To all the sensual world proclaim,
One crowded hour of glorious life
Is worth an age without a name.


by Philip Larkin

New Eyes Each Year

 New eyes each year
Find old books here,
And new books,too,
Old eyes renew;
So youth and age
Like ink and page
In this house join,
Minting new coin.


by Robert Herrick

TO BE MERRY

 Let's now take our time,
While we're in our prime,
And old, old age is afar off;
For the evil, evil days
Will come on apace,
Before we can be aware of.


by William Butler Yeats

The Spur

 You think it horrible that lust and rage
Should dance attention upon my old age;
They were not such a plague when I was young;
What else have I to spur me into song?


by Walter Savage Landor

Ianthe

 From you, Ianthe, little troubles pass
Like little ripples down a sunny river;
Your pleasures spring like daisies in the grass,
Cut down, and up again as blithe as ever.


by Emily Dickinson

The Poets light but Lamps --

 The Poets light but Lamps --
Themselves -- go out --
The Wicks they stimulate --
If vital Light

Inhere as do the Suns --
Each Age a Lens
Disseminating their
Circumference --


by Walter Savage Landor

On His Seventy-fifth Birthday

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife;
Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art;
I warmed both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by Walter Savage Landor

Dying Speech of an Old Philosopher

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife:
Nature I loved, and, next to Nature, Art:
I warm'd both hands before the fire of Life;
It sinks; and I am ready to depart.


by Walter Savage Landor

I Strove with None

 I strove with none, for none was worth my strife.
Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Heri Cras Hodie

SHINES the last age the next with hope is seen  
To-day slinks poorly off unmarked between: 
Future or Past no richer secret folds  
O friendless Present! than thy bosom holds.


by Hilaire Belloc

The Statue

 When we are dead, some Hunting-boy will pass
And find a stone half-hidden in tall grass
And grey with age: but having seen that stone
(Which was your image), ride more slowly on.


by Walter Savage Landor

Finis

 I STROVE with none, for none was worth my strife.
Nature I loved and, next to Nature, Art: I warm'd both hands before the fire of life; It sinks, and I am ready to depart.


by Walter Savage Landor

God Scatters Beauty

 God scatters beauty as he scatters flowers 
O'er the wide earth, and tells us all are ours.
A hundred lights in every temple burn, And at each shrine I bend my knee in turn.


by Walter Savage Landor

On Catullus

 Tell me not what too well I know
About the bard of Sirmio.
Yes, in Thalia’s son Such stains there are—as when a Grace Sprinkles another’s laughing face With nectar, and runs on.


by Walter Savage Landor

On His Eightieth Birthday

 To my ninth decade I have tottered on, 
And no soft arm bends now my steps to steady; 
She, who once led me where she would, is gone, 
So when he calls me, Death shall find me ready.


by Edgar Lee Masters

Alexander Throckmorton

 In youth my wings were strong and tireless,
But I did not know the mountains.
In age I knew the mountains But my weary wings could not follow my vision -- Genius is wisdom and youth.


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