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Best Famous J R R Tolkien Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous J R R Tolkien poems. This is a select list of the best famous J R R Tolkien poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous J R R Tolkien poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of J R R Tolkien poems.

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by J R R Tolkien | |

All That is Gold Does Not Glitter

 All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.
From the ashes a fire shall be woken, A light from the shadows shall spring; Renewed shall be blade that was broken, The crownless again shall be king.


by J R R Tolkien | |

All Woods Must Fail

 O! Wanderers in the shadowed land
Despair not! For though dark they stand,
All woods there be must end at last,
And see the open sun go past:
The setting sun, the rising sun,
The day's end, or the day begun.
For east or west all woods must fail.


by J R R Tolkien | |

All Ye Joyful

 Sing all ye joyful, now sing all together!
The wind's in the tree-top, the wind's in the heather;
The stars are in blossom, the moon is in flower,
And bright are the windows of night in her tower.
Dance all ye joyful, now dance all together! Soft is the grass, and let foot be like feather! The river is silver, the shadows are fleeting; Merry is May-time, and merry our meeting.
Sigh no more pine, till the wind of the morn! Fall Moon! Dark be the land! Hush! Hush! Oak, ash and thorn! Hushed by all water, till dawn is at hand!


by J R R Tolkien | |

Athelas

 When the black breath blows,
And death's shadow grows,
Come Athelas! Come Athelas!
Life to the dying,
In the king's hand lying!


by J R R Tolkien | |

Bath-Song

 Sing hey! For the bath at close of day
that washes the weary mud away
A loon is he that will not sing
O! Water Hot is a noble thing!

O! Sweet is the sound of falling rain,
and the brook that leaps from hill to plain;
but better then rain or rippling streams
is Water Hot that smokes and steams.
O! Water cold we may pour at need down a thirsty throat and be glad indeed but better is beer if drink we lack, and Water Hot poured down the back.
O! Water is fair that leaps on high in a fountain white beneath the sky; but never did fountain sound so sweet as splashing Hot Water with my feet!


by J R R Tolkien | |

Bilbos Last Song (At the Grey Havens)

 Day is ended, dim my eyes,
But journey long before me lies.
Farewell, friends! I hear the call.
The ship's beside the stony wall.
Foam is white and waves are grey; beyond the sunset leads my way.
Foam is salt, the wind is free; I hear the rising of the sea.
Farewell, friends! The sails are set, the wind is east, the moorings fret.
Shadows long before me lie, beneath the ever-bending sky, but islands lie behind the Sun that i shall raise ere all is done; lands there are to west of West, where night is quiet and sleep is rest.
Guided by the Lonely Star, beyond the utmost harbour-bar, I'll find the heavens fair and free, and beaches of the Starlit Sea.
Ship my ship! I seek the West, and fields and mountains ever blest.
Farewell to Middle-earth at last.
I see the star above my mast!


by J R R Tolkien | |

Bregalads Lament

 O Orofarne, Lassemista, Carnimirie!
O rowan fair, upon your hair how white the blossom lay!
O rowan mine, I saw you shine upon a summer's day,
Your rind so bright, your leaves so light, your voice so cool and soft!
Upon your head how golden-red the crown you bare aloft!
O rowan dead, upon your head your haif is dry and grey;
Your crown is spilled, your voice is stilled for ever and a day.
O Orofarne, Lassemista, Carnimirie!


by J R R Tolkien | |

Cat

 The fat cat on the mat
may seem to dream
of nice mice that suffice
for him, or cream;
but he free, maybe,
walks in thought
unbowed, proud, where loud
roared and fought
his kin, lean and slim,
or deep in den
in the East feasted on beasts
and tender men.
The giant lion with iron claw in paw, and huge ruthless tooth in gory jaw; the pard dark-starred, fleet upon feet, that oft soft from aloft leaps upon his meat where woods loom in gloom -- far now they be, fierce and free, and tamed is he; but fat cat on the mat kept as a pet he does not forget.


by J R R Tolkien | |

Gandalfs Song of Lorien

 In Dwimordene, in Lorien
Seldom have walked the feet of men,
Few mortal eyes have seen the light
That lies there ever, long and bright.
Galadriel! Galadriel! Clear is the water of your well; White is the stars in your white hand; Unmarred, unstained is leaf and land In Dwimordene, in Lorien More fair than thoughts of Mortal Men.


by J R R Tolkien | |

Gil-galad

 Gil-galad was an Elven-king.
Of him the harpers sadly sing: The last whose realm was fair and free Between the mountains and the sea.
His sword was long, his lance was keen.
His shining helm afar was seen.
The countless stars of heaven's field Were mirrored in his silver shield.
But long ago he rode away, And where he dwelleth none can say.
For into darkness fell his star; In Mordor, where the shadows are.


by J R R Tolkien | |

I Sit and Think

 I sit beside the fire and think
of all that I have seen,
of meadow-flowers and butterflies
in summers that have been;

Of yellow leaves and gossamer
in autumns that there were,
with morning mist and silver sun
and wind upon my hair.
I sit beside the fire and think of how the world will be when winter comes without a spring that I shall never see.
For still there are so many things that I have never seen: in every wood in every spring there is a different green.
I sit beside the fire and think of people long ago, and people who will see a world that I shall never know.
But all the while I sit and think of times there were before, I listen for returning feet and voices at the door.


by J R R Tolkien | |

Journeys End

 In western lands beneath the Sun
The flowers may rise in Spring,
The trees may bud, the waters run,
The merry finches sing.
Or there maybe 'tis cloudless night, And swaying branches bear The Elven-stars as jewels white Amid their branching hair.
Though here at journey's end I lie In darkness buried deep, Beyond all towers strong and high, Beyond all mountains steep, Above all shadows rides the Sun And Stars for ever dwell: I will not say the Day is done, Nor bid the Stars farewell.


by J R R Tolkien | |

Lament for Eorl the Young

 Where now is the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing?
Where is the helm and the hauberk, and the bright hair flowing?
Where is the hand on the harpstring, and the red fire glowing?
They have passed like rain on the mountain, like a wind in the meadow;
The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow.
Who shall gather the smoke of the deadwood burning, Or behold the flowing years from the Sea returning?


by J R R Tolkien | |

Lebennin

 Silver flow the streams from Colos to Erui
In the green fields of Lebennin!
Tall grows the grass there.
In the wind from the Sea The white lilies sway, And the golden bells are shaken of mallos and alfirin In the green fields of Lebennin, In the wind from the Sea!


by J R R Tolkien | |

One Ring

 Ash nazg durbatulûk, ash nazg gimbatul,
Ash nazg thrakutulûk agh burzum-ishi krimpatul.
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky, Seven for the dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die, One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.


by J R R Tolkien | |

One White Tree

 Tall ships and tall kings
Three times three.
What brought they from the foundered land Over the flowing sea? Seven stars and seven stones And one white tree.


by J R R Tolkien | |

Seasons

 In the willow-meads of Tasarinan I walked in the Spring.
Ah! The sight and smell of the Spring in Nantasarion! And I said that was good.
I wandered in Summer in the elm-woods of Ossiriand.
Ah! The light and the music in the Summer by the Seven Rivers of Ossir! And I thought that was best.
To the beeches of Neldoreth I came in the Autumn.
Ah! The gold and red and the sighing of leaves in the Autumn in Taur-na-neldor! It was more than my desire.
To the pine-trees upon the highland of Dorthonion I climbed in Winter.
Ah! The wind and the whiteness and the black branches of Winter upon Orod-na-Thon! My voice went up and sang in the sky.
And now all those lands lie under the wave, And I walk in Ambarona, in Tauremorna, in Aldalome, In my own land, in the country of Fangorn, Where the roots are long, And the years lie thicker than leaves In Tauremornalome.


by J R R Tolkien | |

Sing All Ye People!

 Sing now, ye people of the Tower of Anor,
For the Realm of Sauron is ended for ever,
And the Dark Tower is thrown down.
Sing and rejoice, ye people of the Tower of Guard, For your watch hath not been in vain, And the Black Gate is broken, And your King hath passed through, And he is victorious.
Sing and be glad, all ye children of the West, For your King shall come again, And he shall dwell amoung you All the days of your life.
And the Tree that was withered shall be renewed, And he shall plant it in the high places, And the City shall be blessed.
Sing all ye people!


by J R R Tolkien | |

The King

 The King beneath the mountains,
The King of carven stone,
The lord of silver fountains,
Shall come into his own!

His crown shall be upholden,
His harp shall be restrung,
His halls shall echo golden,
To songs of yore re-sung.
The woods shall wave on mountains, And grass beneath the sun; His wealth shall flow in fountains, And the rivers golden run.
The streams shall run in gladness, The lakes shall shine and burn, All sorrow fail and sadness, At the Mountain-king's return.


by J R R Tolkien | |

The Sea

 To the Sea, to the Sea! The white gulls are crying,
The wind is blowing, and the white foam is flying.
West, west away, the round sun is falling.
Grey ship, grey ship, do you hear them calling? The voices of my people gone before me? I will leave, I will leave the woods that bore me; For our days are ending and our years failing.
I will pass the wide waters lonely sailing.
Long are the waves on the Last Shore falling, Sweet are the voices in the Lost Isle calling.
In Eressea, in Elvenhome, that no man can discover, Where the leaves fall not: land of my people forever!