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Best Famous J R R Tolkien Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous J R R Tolkien poems. This is a select list of the best famous J R R Tolkien poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous J R R Tolkien poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of J R R Tolkien poems.

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Written by J R R Tolkien |

Journeys End

 In western lands beneath the Sun
The flowers may rise in Spring,
The trees may bud, the waters run,
The merry finches sing.r>
Or there maybe 'tis cloudless night,
And swaying branches bear
The Elven-stars as jewels white
Amid their branching hair.r>

Though here at journey's end I lie
In darkness buried deep,
Beyond all towers strong and high,
Beyond all mountains steep,
Above all shadows rides the Sun
And Stars for ever dwell:
I will not say the Day is done,
Nor bid the Stars farewell.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |

O! Where Are You Going?

 O! What are you doing,
And where are you going?
Your ponies need shoeing!
The River is flowing!
O! Tra-la-la-lally
Here down in the valley!

O! What are you seeking,
And where are you making?
The faggots are reeking!
The bannocks are baking!
O! Tril-lil-lil-lolly
The valley is jolly
Ha ha!

O! Where are you going,
With beards all a-wagging?
No knowing, no knowing
What brings Mister Baggins,
And Balin and Dwalin
Down into the valley
In June
Ha ha!

O! Will you be staying,
Or will you be flying?
Your ponies are straying!
The daylight is dying!
To fly would be folly,
To stay would be jolly!
And listen and hark
Till the end of the dark
To our tune.r>
Ha ha!

The dragon is withered,
His bones are now crumbled!
His armor is shivered,
His splendour is humbled!
Though sword shall be rusted
And throne and crown perish,
With strength that men trusted
And wealth that they cherish,
Here grass is still growing,
And leaves are yet swinging!
The white water is flowing,
And elves are yet singing!
Come! Tra-la-la-lally!
Come back to the valley!

The stars are far brighter
Than gems without measure,
The moon is far whiter
Than silver in treasure:
The fire is more shining
On hearth in the gloaming
Than gold won by mining,
So why so a-roaming?
O! Tra-la-la-lally!
Come back to the Valley!

O! Where are you going?
So late in returning?
The water is flowing!
The stars are all burning!
O! Whither so laden,
So sad and so dreary?
Here elf and elf-maiden
Now welcome the weary!
With tra-la-la-lally
Come back to the Valley,
Ha ha!

Written by J R R Tolkien |

All That is Gold Does Not Glitter

 All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost.r>
From the ashes a fire shall be woken,
A light from the shadows shall spring;
Renewed shall be blade that was broken,
The crownless again shall be king.r>

More great poems below...

Written by J R R Tolkien |


 Snow-white! Snow-white! O lady clear!
O Queen beyond the Western Sea!
O Light to us that wander here
Amid the world of woven trees!

Gilthoniel! O Elbereth!
Clear are thy eyes and bright thy breath.r>
Snow-white! Snow-white! We sing to thee
In a far land beyond the Sea.r>

O stars that in the Sunless Year
With shining hand by her were sown,
In windy fields now bright and clear
We see your silver blossom blown.r>

O Elbereth! Gilthoniel!
We still remember, we who dwell
In this far land beneath the trees,
Thy starlight on the Western Seas.r>

A Elbereth Gilthoniel,
Silivren penna miriel
O menal aglar elenath!
Na-chaered palan-diriel
O galadhremmin ennorath,
Fanuilos, le linnathon
nef aear, si nef aearon!

Ai! laurie lantar lassi surinen!
Yeni unotime ve ramar aldaron,
Yeni ve linte yuldar vanier
Mi oromardi lisse-miruvoreva
Andune pella Vardo tellumar
Nu luini yassen tintilar i eleni
Omaryo airetari-lirinen.r>

Si man i yulma nin enquantuva?

An si Tintalle Varda Oilosseo
Ve fanyar maryat Elentari ortane,
Ar ilye tier undulare lumbule;
Ar sindanoriello caita mornie
I falmalinnar imbe met, ar hisie
Untupa Calaciryo miri oiale.r>
Si vanwa na, Romello vanwa, Valimar!
Namarie! Nai hiruvalye Valimar.r>
Nai elye hiruva.r> Namarie!

Ah! Like gold fall the leaves in the wind,
Long years numberless as the wings of trees!
The long years have passed like swift draughts of the sweet mead
In lofty halls beyond the West
Beneath the blue vaults of Varda
Wherein the stars tremble in the song of her voice,
Holy and queenly.r>

Who now shall refill the cup for me?

For now the Kindler, Varda,
The Queen of the Stars, from Mount Everwhite
Has uplifted her hands like clouds,
And all paths are drowned deep in shadow;
And out of a grey country darkness lies on the foaming waves between us,
And mist covers the jewels of Calacirya for ever.r>
Now lost, lost to those from the East is Valimar!

Farewell! Maybe thou shalt find Valimar.r>
Maybe even thou shalt find it! Farewell!

Gilthoniel A Elbereth!
A Elbereth Gilthoniel
O menel palan-diriel,
Le nallon si dinguruthos!
A tiro nin, Fanuilos!

A! Elbereth Gilthoniel!
Silivren penna miriel
O menal aglar elenath,
Gilthoniel, A! Elbereth!
We still remember, we who dwell
In this far land beneath the trees
Thy starlight on the Western Seas.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |


 The leaves were long, the grass was green,
The hemlock-umbels tall and fair,
And in the glade a light was seen
Of stars in shadow shimmering.r>
Tinuviel was dancing there
To music of a pipe unseen,
And light of stars was in her hair,
And in her raiment glimmering.r>

There Beren came from mountains cold,
And lost he wandered under leaves,
And where the Elven-river rolled,
He walked alone and sorrowing.r>
He peered between the hemlock-leaves
And saw in wonder flowers of gold
Upon her mantle and her sleeves,
And her hair like shadow following.r>

Enchantment healed his weary feet
That over hills were doomed to roam;
And forth he hastened, strong and fleet,
And grasped at moonbeams glistening.r>
Through woven woods in Elvenhome
She lightly fled on dancing feet,
And left him lonely still to roam
In the silent forest listening.r>

He heard there oft the flying sound
Of feet as light as linden-leaves,
Or music welling underground,
In hidden hollows quavering.r>
Now withered lay the hemlock-leaves,
And one by one with sighing sound,
Whispering fell the beechen leaves
In the wintry woodland wavering.r>

He sought her ever, wandering far
Where leaves of years were thickly strewn,
By light of moon and ray of star
In frosty heavens shivering.r>
Her mantle glinted in the moon,
As on a hill-top high and far
She danced, and at her feet was strewn
A mist of silver quivering.r>

When winter passed, she came again,
And her song released the sudden spring,
Like rising lark, and falling rain,
And melting water bubbling.r>
He saw the elven-flowers spring
About her feet, and healed again,
He longed by her to dance and sing
Upon the grass untroubling.r>

Again she fled, but swift he came.r>
Tinuviel! Tinuviel!
He called her by her elvish name;
And there she halted listening.r>
One moment stood she, and a spell
His voice lay on her: Beren came,
And doom fell on Tinuviel
That in his arms lay glistening.r>

As Beren looked into her eyes
Within the shadows of her hair,
The trembling starlight of the skies
He saw there mirrored shimmering.r>
Tinuviel the elven-fair,
Immortal maiden elven-wise,
About him cast her shadowy hair
And arms like silver glimmering.r>

Long was the way that fate them bore,
O'er stony mountains cold and grey,
Through halls of iron and darkling door,
And woods of nightshade morrowless.r>
The Sundering Seas between them lay,
And yet at last they met once more,
And long ago they passed away
In the forest singing sorrowless.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |


 An Elven-maid there was of old,
A shining star by day.r>
Her mantle white was hemmed with gold,
Her shoes of silver-grey.r>

A star was bound upon her brows,
A light was on her hair
As sun upon the golden boughs
In Lorien the fair.r>

Her hair was long, her limbs were white,
And fair she was and free;
And in the wind she went as light
As leaf of linden-tree.r>

Beside the falls of Nimrodel,
By water clear and cool,
Her voice as falling silver fell
Into the shining pool.r>

Where now she wanders none can tell,
In sunlight or in shade;
For lost of yore was Nimrodel
And in the mountains strayed.r>

The elven-ships in haven grey
Beneath the mountain-lee
Awaited her for many a day
Beside the roaring sea.r>

A wind by night in Northern lands
Arose, and loud it cried,
And drove the ship from elven-strands
Across the steaming tide.r>

When dawn came dim the land was lost,
The mountains sinking grey
Beyond the heaving waves that tossed
Their plumes of blinding spray.r>

Amroth beheld the fading shore
Now low beyond the swell,
And cursed the faithless ship that bore
Him far from Nimrodel.r>

Of old he was an Elven-king,
A lord of tree and glen,
When golden were the boughs in spring
In fair Lothlorien.r>

From helm to sea they saw him leap,
As arrow from the string,
And dive into the water deep,
As mew upon the wing.r>

The wind was in his flowing hair,
The foam about him shone;
Afar they saw him strong and fair
Go riding like a swan.r>

But from the West has come no word,
And on the Hither Shore
No tidings Elven-folk have heard
Of Amroth evermore.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |


 The world was young, the mountains green,
No stain yet on the Moon was seen,
No words were laid on stream or stone,
When Durin woke and walked along.r>
He named the nameless hills and delles;
He drank from yet untasted wells;
He stopped and looked in Mirrormere,
And saw a crown of stars appear,
As gems upon a silver thread,
Above the shadow of his head.r>
The world was fair, the mountains tall,
In Elder Days before the fall
Of mighty kings in Nargothrond
And Gondolin, who now beyond
The Western Seas have passed away.r>
The world was fair in Durin's Day.r>

A king he was on carven throne
In many-pillared halls of stone
With golden roof and silver floor,
And runes of power upon the door.r>
The light of sun and star and moon
In shining lamps of crystal hewn
Undimmed by cloud or shade of night
There shown for ever fair and bright.r>

There hammer on the anvil smote,
There chisel clove, and graver wrote;
There forged was blade, and bound was hilt;
The delver mined, the mason built.r>
There beryl, pearl, and opal pale,
And metal wrought like fishes' mail,
Buckler and corslet, axe and sword,
And shining spears were laid in hoard.r>
Unwearied then were Durin's folk;
Beneath the mountain music woke:
The harpers harped, the minstrels sang,
And at the gates the trumpets rang.r>

The world is grey, the mountains old,
The forge's fire is ashen-cold;
No harp is wrung, no hammer falls:
The darkness dwells in Durin's halls;
The shadow lies upon his tomb
In Moria, in Khazad-dum.r>
But still the sunken stars appear
In dark and windless Mirrormere;
There lies his crown in water deep.r>
Till Durin wakes again from sleep.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |

Finrods Song

 He chanted a song of wizardry,
Of piercing, opening, of treachery,
Revealing, uncovering, betraying.r>
Then sudden Felagund there swaying
Sang in answer a song of staying,
Resisting, battling against power,
Of secrets kept, strength like a tower,
And trust unbroken, freedom, escape;
Of changing and of shifting shape
Of snares eluded, broken traps,
The prison opening, the chain that snaps.r>
Backwards and forwards swayed their song.r>
Reeling and foundering, as ever more strong
The chanting swelled, Felagund fought,
And all the magic and might he brought
Of Elvenesse into his words.r>
Softly in the gloom they heard the birds
Singing afar in Nargothrond,
The sighing of the Sea beyond,
Beyond the western world, on sand,
On sand of pearls in Elvenland.r>
Then the gloom gathered; darkness growing
In Valinor, the red blood flowing
Beside the Sea, where the Noldor slew
The Foamriders, and stealing drew
Their white ships with their white sails
From lamplit havens.r> The wind wails,
The wolf howls.r> The ravens flee.r>
The ice mutters in the mouths of the Sea.r>
The captives sad in Angband mourn.r>
Thunder rumbles, the fires burn ---
And Finrod fell before the throne.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |

Roads Go Ever On

 Roads go ever ever on,
Over rock and under tree,
By caves where never sun has shone,
By streams that never find the sea;
Over snow by winter sown,
And through the merry flowers of June,
Over grass and over stone,
And under mountains in the moon.r>

Roads go ever ever on,
Under cloud and under star.r>
Yet feet that wandering have gone
Turn at last to home afar.r>
Eyes that fire and sword have seen,
And horror in the halls of stone
Look at last on meadows green,
And trees and hills they long have known.r>

The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.r>
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way,
Where many paths and errands meet.r>

The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.r>
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with weary feet,
Until it joins some larger way,
Where many paths and errands meet.r>
And whither then? I cannot say.r>

The Road goes ever on and on
Out from the door where it began.r>
Now far ahead the Road has gone.r>
Let others follow, if they can!
Let them a journety new begin.r>
But I at last with weary feet
Will turn towards the lighted inn,
My evening-rest and sleep to meet.r>

Still 'round the corner there may wait
A new road or secret gate;
And though I oft have passed them by,
A day will come at last when I
Shall take the hidden paths that run
West of the Moon, East of the Sun.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |

To the Bottle I Go

 Ho! Ho! Ho! To the bottle I go
To heal my heart and drown my woe.r>
Rain may fall and wind may blow,
And many miles be still to go
But under a tall tree I will lie,
And let the clouds go sailing by.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |

Troll Sat Alone on His Seat of Stone

 Troll sat alone on his seat of stone,
And munched and mumbled a bare old bone;
For many a year he had gnawed it near,
For meat was hard to come by.r>
Done by! Gum by!
In a cave in the hills he dwelt alone,
And meat was hard to come by.r>

Up came Tom with his big boots on.r>
Said he to Troll: 'Pray, what is yon?
For it looks like the shin o' my nuncle Tim.r>
As should be a-lyin' in the graveyard.r>
Caveyard! Paveyard!
This many a year has Tim been gone,
And I thought he were lyin' in the graveyard.r>'

'My lad,' said Troll, 'this bone I stole.r>
But what be bones that lie in a hole?
Thy nuncle was dead as a lump o' lead,
Afore I found his shinbone.r>
Tinbone! Skinbone!
He can spare a share for a poor old troll,
For he don't need his shinbone.r>'

Said Tom: 'I don't see why the likes o' thee
Without axin' leave should go makin' free
With the shank or the shin o' my father's kin;
So hand the old bone over!
Rover! Trover!
Though dead he be, it belongs to he;
So hand the old bone over!'

'For a couple o' pins,' says Troll, and grins,
'I'll eat thee too, and gnaw thy shins.r>
A bit o' fresh meat will go down sweet!
I'll try my teeth on thee now.r>
Hee now! See now!
I'm tired o' gnawing old bones and skins;
I've a mind to dine on thee now.r>'

But just as he thought his dinner was caught,
He found his hands had hold of naught.r>
Before he could mind, Tom slipped behind
And gave him the boot to larn him.r>
Warn him! Darn him!
A bump o' the boot on the seat, Tom thought,
Would be the way to larn him.r>

But harder than stone is the flesh and bone
Of a troll that sits in the hills alone.r>
As well set your boot to the mountain's root,
For the seat of a troll don't feel it.r>
Peel it! Heal it!
Old Troll laughed, when he heard Tom groan,
And he knew his toes could feel it.r>

Tom's leg is game, since home he came,
And his bootless foot is lasting lame;
But Troll don't care, and he's still there
With the bone he boned from its owner.r>
Doner! Boner!
Troll's old seat is still the same,
And the bone he boned from its owner!

Written by J R R Tolkien |


 Ai! laurië lantar lassi súrinen,
Yéni únótimë ve rámar aldaron!
Yéni ve lintë yuldar avánier
Mi oromardi lissë-miruvóreva
Andúnë pella, Vardo tellumar
Nu luini yassen tintilar i eleni
Omaryo airetári-lírinen.r>
Sí man i yulma nin enquantuva?

An sí Tintallë Varda Oiolossëo
Ve fanyarryat Elentári ortanë
Ar ilyë tier undulávë lumbulë
Ar sindanóriello caita mornië 
I falmalinnar imbë met,
Ar hísië untúpa Calaciryo míri oialë.r>
Sí vanwa ná, Rómello vanwa, Valimar!

Namárië! Nai hiruvalyë Valimar!
Nai elyë hiruva! Namárië!

Ah! like gold fall the leaves in the wind,
Long years numberless as the wings of trees!
The long years have passed like swift draughts
Of the sweet mead in lofty halls
Beyond the West, beneath the blue vaults of Varda
Wherein the stars tremble
In the voice of her song, holy and queenly.r>
Who now shall refill the cup for me?

For now the Kindler, Varda, the Queen of the stars,
From Mount Everwhite has uplifted her hands like clouds
And all paths are drowned deep in shadow;
And out of a grey country darkness lies
On the foaming waves between us,
And mist covers the jewels of Calacirya for ever.r>
Now lost, lost to those of the East is Valimar!

Farewell! Maybe thou shalt find Valimar!
Maybe even thou shalt find it! Farewell!

Written by J R R Tolkien |

Bilbos Last Song (At the Grey Havens)

 Day is ended, dim my eyes,
But journey long before me lies.r>
Farewell, friends! I hear the call.r>
The ship's beside the stony wall.r>
Foam is white and waves are grey;
beyond the sunset leads my way.r>
Foam is salt, the wind is free;
I hear the rising of the sea.r>

Farewell, friends! The sails are set,
the wind is east, the moorings fret.r>
Shadows long before me lie,
beneath the ever-bending sky,
but islands lie behind the Sun
that i shall raise ere all is done;
lands there are to west of West,
where night is quiet and sleep is rest.r>

Guided by the Lonely Star,
beyond the utmost harbour-bar,
I'll find the heavens fair and free,
and beaches of the Starlit Sea.r>
Ship my ship! I seek the West,
and fields and mountains ever blest.r>
Farewell to Middle-earth at last.r>
I see the star above my mast!

Written by J R R Tolkien |


 The fat cat on the mat
may seem to dream
of nice mice that suffice
for him, or cream;
but he free, maybe,
walks in thought
unbowed, proud, where loud
roared and fought
his kin, lean and slim,
or deep in den
in the East feasted on beasts
and tender men.r>
The giant lion with iron
claw in paw,
and huge ruthless tooth
in gory jaw;
the pard dark-starred,
fleet upon feet,
that oft soft from aloft
leaps upon his meat
where woods loom in gloom --
far now they be,
fierce and free,
and tamed is he;
but fat cat on the mat
kept as a pet
he does not forget.r>

Written by J R R Tolkien |

I Sit and Think

 I sit beside the fire and think
of all that I have seen,
of meadow-flowers and butterflies
in summers that have been;

Of yellow leaves and gossamer
in autumns that there were,
with morning mist and silver sun
and wind upon my hair.r>

I sit beside the fire and think
of how the world will be
when winter comes without a spring
that I shall never see.r>

For still there are so many things
that I have never seen:
in every wood in every spring
there is a different green.r>

I sit beside the fire and think
of people long ago,
and people who will see a world
that I shall never know.r>

But all the while I sit and think
of times there were before,
I listen for returning feet
and voices at the door.r>