Submit Your Poems
Get Your Premium Membership



Best Famous Aleister Crowley Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Aleister Crowley poems. This is a select list of the best famous Aleister Crowley poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Aleister Crowley poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Aleister Crowley poems.

Search for the best famous Aleister Crowley poems, articles about Aleister Crowley poems, poetry blogs, or anything else Aleister Crowley poem related using the PoetrySoup search engine at the top of the page.

See also:

Famous poems below this ad
Written by Aleister Crowley | |

The Tent

 Only the stars endome the lonely camp,
Only the desert leagues encompass it;
Waterless wastes, a wilderness of wit,
Embattled Cold, Imagination's Cramp.
Now were the Desolation fain to stamp The congealed Spirit of man into the pit, Save that, unquenchable because unlit, The Love of God burns steady, like a Lamp.
It burns ! beyond the sands, beyond the stars.
It burns ! beyond the bands, beyond the bars.
And so the Expanse of Mystery, veil by veil, Burns inward, plume on plume still folding over The dissolved heart of the amazéd lover- The angel wings upon the Holy Grail! W'aint t' Aissha.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

The Hermit

 NOW the quietude of earth
Nestles deep my heart within;
Friendships new and strange have birth
Since I left the city’s din.
Here the tempest stays its guile, Like a big kind brother plays, Romps and pauses here awhile From its immemorial ways.
Now the silver light of dawn, Slipping through the leaves that fleck My one window, hurries on, Throws its arms around my neck.
Darkness to my doorway hies, Lays her chin upon the roof, And her burning seraph eyes Now no longer keep aloof.
And the ancient mystery Holds its hands out day by day, Takes a chair and croons with me By my cabin built of clay.
When the dusky shadow flits, By the chimney nook I see Where the old enchanter sits, Smiles and waves and beckons me.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Hymn to Pan

 SING his praises that doth keep
 Our flocks from harm.
Pan, the father of our sheep; And arm in arm Tread we softly in a round, Whilst the hollow neighbouring ground Fills the music with her sound.
Pan, O great god Pan, to thee Thus do we sing! Thou who keep'st us chaste and free As the young spring: Ever be thy honour spoke From that place the morn is broke To that place day doth unyoke!


More great poems below...

Written by Aleister Crowley | |

The Quest

 High, hollowed in green
above the rocks of reason
lies the crater lake
whose ice the dreamer breaks
to find a summer season.
'He will plunge like a plummet down far into hungry tides' they cry, but as the sea climbs to a lunar magnet so the dreamer pursues the lake where love resides.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Thanatos Basileos

 The serpent dips his head beneath the sea
His mother, source of all his energy
Eternal, thence to draw the strength he needs
On earth to do indomitable dees
Once more; and they, who saw but understood
Naught of his nature of beatitude
Were awed: they murmured with abated breath;
Alas the Master; so he sinks in death.
But whoso knows the mystery of man Sees life and death as curves of one same plan.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Logos

 Out of the night forth flamed a star -mine own!
Now seventy light-years nearer as I urge
Constant my heart through the abyss unknown,
Its glory my sole guide while space surge
About me.
Seventy light-yaers! As I near That gate of light that men call death, its cold Pale gleam begins to pulse, a throbbing sphere, Systole and diastole of eager gold, New life immortal, wartmth of passion bleed Till night's black velvet burn to crimson.
Hark! It is thy voice, Thy word, the secret seed Of rapture that admonishes the dark.
Swift! By necessity most righteous drawn, Hermes, authentic augur of the dawn!


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

The Five Adorations

 I praise Thee, God, whose rays upstart beneath the Bright
and Morning Star:
Nowit asali fardh salat assobhi allahu akbar.
I praise Thee, God, the fierce and swart; at noon Thou ridest forth to war! Nowit asali fardh salat assohri allahu akabr.
I praise Thee, God, whose arrows dart their royal radiance o'er the scar: Nowit asali fardh salat asasri allahu akabr.
I praise Thee, God, whose fires depart, who drivest down the sky thy car: Nowit asali fardh salat al maghrab allahu akabr.
I praise Thee, God, whose purple heart is hidden in the abyss afar: Nowit asali fardh salat al asha allahu akabr.
DOST ACHIHA KHAN.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Adela

 Jupiter Mars P Moon
VENEZIA, "May" 19"th", 1910.
Jupiter's foursquare blaze of gold and blue Rides on the moon, a lilac conch of pearl, As if the dread god, charioted anew Came conquering, his amazing disk awhirl To war down all the stars.
I see him through The hair of this mine own Italian girl, Adela That bends her face on mine in the gondola! There is scarce a breath of wind on the lagoon.
Life is absorbed in its beatitude, A meditative mage beneath the moon Ah! should we come, a delicate interlude, To Campo Santo that, this night of June, Heals for awhile the immitigable feud? Adela! Your breath ruffles my soul in the gondola! Through maze on maze of silent waterways, Guarded by lightless sentinel palaces, We glide; the soft plash of the oar, that sways Our life, like love does, laps --- no softer seas Swoon in the bosom of Pacific bays! We are in tune with the infinite ecstasies, Adela! Sway with me, sway with me in the gondola! They hold us in, these tangled sepulchres That guard such ghostly life.
They tower above Our passage like the cliffs of death.
There stirs No angel from the pinnacles thereof.
All broods, all breeds.
But immanent as Hers That reigns is this most silent crown of love Adela That broods on me, and is I, in the gondola.
They twist, they twine, these white and black canals, Now stark with lamplight, now a reach of Styx.
Even as out love - raging wild animals Suddenly hoisted on the crucifix To radiate seraphic coronals, Flowers, flowers - O let our light and darkness mix, Adela, Goddess and beast with me in the gondola! Come! though your hair be a cascade of fire, Your lips twin snakes, your tongue the lightning flash, Your teeth God's grip on life, your face His lyre, Your eyes His stars - come, let our Venus lash Our bodies with the whips of Her desire.
Your bed's the world, your body the world-ash, Adela! Shall I give the word to the man of the gondola?


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

An Oath

 (An Oath wrtitten during the Dawn Meditation)

Aiwaz! Confirm my troth with thee ! my will inspire
With secret sperm of subtle, free, creating Fire!
Mould thou my very flesh as Thine, renew my birth
In childhood merry as divine, enchenated earth!
Dissolve my rapture in Thine own, a sacred slaugther
Whereby to capture and atone the soul of water!
Fill thou my mind with gleaming Thought intense and rare
To One refined, outflung to naught, the Word of Air!
Most, bridal bound, my quintessentil Form thus freeing
From self, be found one Selfhood blent in Spirit Being.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Arhan

 When the chill of earth black-breasted is uplifted at the
glance
Of the red sun million-crested, and the forest blossoms
dance
With the light that stirs and lustres of the dawn, and with
the bloom
Of the wind’s cheek as it clusters from the hidden valley’s
gloom :
Then I walk in woodland spaces, musing on the solemn
ways
Of the immemorial places shut behind the starry rays
Of the East and all its splendour, of the West and all its peace;
And the stubborn lights grow tender, and the hard sounds
hush and cease.
In the wheel of heaven revolving, mysteries of death and birth, In the wonb of time dissolving, shape anew a heaven and earth Ever changing, ever growing, ever dwindling, ever dear, Ever worth the passion glowing to distil a doubtful tear.
These are with me, these are of me, these approve me, these obey, Choose me, move me, fear me, love me, master of the night and day.
These are real, these illusion : I am of them, false or frail, True or lasting, all is fusion in the spirit’s shadow-veil, Till the knowledge -Lotus flowering hides the world beneath its stem; Neither I, nor nor God life-showering, find a counterpart in them.
As a spirit in a vision shows a countenance in fear, Laughs the looker to derision, only comes to disappear, Gods and mortals, mind and matter, in the glowing bud dissever : Vein from vein they rend and shatter, and are nothingness for ever.
In the blessed, the enlightened, perfect eyes these visions pass, Pass and cease, poor shadows frightened, leave no stain upon the glass.
One last stroke, O heart- free master, one last certain calm of will, And the maker of Disaster shall be strcken and grow still.
Burn thou to the core of matter, to the spirit’s utmost flame, Consciousness and sense to shatter, ruin sight and form and name! Shatter, lake-reflected spectre; lake, rise up in mist to sun; Sun, dissolve in showers of nectar, and the Master’s work is done.
Nectar perfume gently stealing, masterful and sweet and strong, Cleanse the world with light of healing in the ancient House of Wrong ! Free a million mortals on the wheel og being tossed ! Open wide the mystic portals, and be altogether lost! At Akyab.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

At Bordj-an-Nus

 El Arabi! El Arabi! Burn in thy brilliance, mine own!
O Beautiful! O Barbarous! Seductive as a serpent is
That poises head and hood, and makes his body tremble to the drone
Of tom-tom and of cymbal wooed by love's assassin sorceries!
El Arabi! El Arabi!
The moon is down; we are alone;
May not our mouths meet, madden, mix, melt in the starlight of a kiss?
El Arabi!

There by the palms, the desert's edge, I drew thee to my heart and held
Thy shy slim beauty for a splendid second; and fell moaning back,
Smitten by Love's forked flashing rod -as if the uprooted mandrake yelled!
As if I had seen God, and died! I thirst! I writhe upon the rack!
El Arabi! El Arabi!
It is not love! I am compelled
By some fierce fate, a vulture poised, heaven's single ominous speck of black.
El Arabi! There in the lonely bordj across the dreadful lines of sleeping men, Swart sons of the Sahara, thou didst writhe slim, sinuous and swift, Warning me with a viper's hiss -and was not death upon us then, No bastard of thy maiden kiss? God's grace, the all-surpassing gift! El Arabi! El Arabi! Yea, death is man's Elixir when Life's pale wine foams and splashes over his imagination's rim! El Arabi! El Arabi! El Arabi! witch-amber and obsidian Thine eyes are, to ensorcell me, and leonine thy male caress.
Will not God grant us Paradise to end the music Earth began? We play with loaded dice! He cannot choose but raise right hand to bless.
El Arabi! El Arabi! Great is the love of God and man While I am trembling in thine arms, wild wanderer of the wilderness! El Arabi!


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

At Sea

 As night hath stars, more rare than ships
In ocean, faint from pole to pole,
So all the wonder of her lips
Hints her innavigable soul.
Such lights she gives as guide my bark; But I am swallowed in the swell Of her heart's ocean, sagely dark, That holds my heaven and holds my hell.
In her I live, a mote minute Dancing a moment in the sun: In her I die, a sterile shoot Of nightshade in oblivion.
In her my elf dissolves, a grain Of salt cast careless in the sea; My passion purifies my pain To peace past personality.
Love of my life, God grant the years Confirm the chrism - rose to rood! Anointing loves, asperging tears In sanctifying solitude! Man is so infinitely small In all these stars, determinate.
Maker and moulder of them all, Man is so infinitely great!


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Athor and Asar

 [Dedicated to Frank Harris, editor of Vanity Fair]

On the black night, beneath the winter moon,
I clothed me in the limbs of Codia,
Swooning my soul out into her red throat,
So that the glimmer of our skins, the tune
Og our ripe rythm, seemed the hideous play
Of death-worms crawling on a corpse,afloat
With life that takes its thirst
Only from things accurst.
Closer than Clodia's clasp, Death had me down To his black heart, and fed upon my breath, So that we seemed a stilness -whiter than The stars, more silent than the stars, a crown Of Stars ! For in the icy kiss of death I found that God that is denied to man So long as love and thought And life avail him aught.


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Au Bal

 [Dedicated to Horace Sheridan-Bickers]

A vision of flushed faces, shining limbs,
The madness of the music that entrances
All life in its delirium of dances!
The white world glitters in the void, and swims
Through the infinite seas of transcendental trances.
Yea! all the hoarded seed of all my fancies Bursts in a shower of suns! The wine-cup brims And bubbles over; I drink deep hymns Of sorceries, of spells, of necromancies; And all my spirit shudders; dew bedims My sight -these girls and their alluring glances! Their eyes that burn like dawn's lascivious lances Walking all earth to love -to love! Life skims The cream of joy.
If God could see what man sees, (Intoxicating Nellies, Mauds and Nances!) I see Him leave the sapphrine expanses, The choir serene and the celestial air To swoon into their sacramental hair!


Written by Aleister Crowley | |

Ave Adonai

 [Dedicated to G.
M.
Marston] Pale as the night that pales In the dawn's pearl-pure pavillion, I wait for thee, with my dove's breast Shuddering, a god its bitter guest- Have I not gilded my nails And painted my lips with vermillion ? Am I not wholly stript Of the deeds and thoughts that obscure thee? I wait for thee, my soul distraught With aching for some nameless naught In its most arcane crypt- Am I not fit to endure thee? Girded about the paps With a golden girdle of glory, Dost thou wait me, thy slave who am, As a wolf lurks for a strayed white lamb? The chain of the stars snaps, And the deep of night is hoary! Thou whose mouth is a flame With its seven-edged sword proceeding, Come ! I am writhing with despair Like a snake taken in a snare, Moaning thy mystical name Till my tongue is torn and bleeding! Have I not gilded my nails And painted my lips with vermillion? Yea ! thou art I; the deed awakes, Thy lightening strikes; thy thunder breaks Wild as the bride that wails In the bridegroom's plumed pavillion!