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Best Famous Li Po Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Li Po poems. This is a select list of the best famous Li Po poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Li Po poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Li Po poems.

Search for the best famous Li Po poems, articles about Li Po poems, poetry blogs, or anything else Li Po poem related using the PoetrySoup search engine at the top of the page.

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Written by Li Po |

Drinking Alone

 I take my wine jug out among the flowers
to drink alone, without friends.
I raise my cup to entice the moon.
That, and my shadow, makes us three.
But the moon doesn't drink, and my shadow silently follows.
I will travel with moon and shadow, happy to the end of spring.
When I sing, the moon dances.
When I dance, my shadow dances, too.
We share life's joys when sober.
Drunk, each goes a separate way.
Constant friends, although we wander, we'll meet again in the Milky Way.

Written by Li Po |


 There was wine in a cup of gold
and a girl of fifteen from Wu,
her eyebrows painted dark
and with slippers of red brocade.
If her conversation was poor, how beautifully she could sing! Together we dined and drank until she settled in my arms.
Behind her curtains embroidered with lotuses, how could I refuse the temptation of her advances?

Written by Li Po |

Song Of The Jade Cup

 A jade cup was broken because old age came
too soon to give fulfilment to hopes; after drinking
three cups of wine I wiped my sword and
started to dance under an autumn moon first
singing in a high voice then unable to halt
tears coming; I remember the day when first
I was summoned to court and I was feasted splendidly
writing poems in praise of the Emperor, making
jokes with officials around several times changing
my horse, taking the best from the
imperial stables; with my whip studded with
jade and coral presented to me by the Emperor,
my life was free and easy, people calling me
the "Banished Immortal.
" Hsi Shih was good at smiling as well as frowning, useless for ordinary girls to try and imitate her.
Surely it was only her loveliness the king adored, but unfortunately jealousy within the palace led to her death.

More great poems below...

Written by Li Po |

Alone And Drinking Under The Moon

 Amongst the flowers I
am alone with my pot of wine
drinking by myself; then lifting
my cup I asked the moon
to drink with me, its reflection
and mine in the wine cup, just
the three of us; then I sigh
for the moon cannot drink,
and my shadow goes emptily along
with me never saying a word;
with no other friends here, I can
but use these two for company;
in the time of happiness, I
too must be happy with all
around me; I sit and sing
and it is as if the moon
accompanies me; then if I
dance, it is my shadow that
dances along with me; while
still not drunk, I am glad
to make the moon and my shadow
into friends, but then when
I have drunk too much, we
all part; yet these are
friends I can always count on
these who have no emotion
whatsoever; I hope that one day
we three will meet again,
deep in the Milky Way.

Written by Stanley Kunitz |

After The Last Dynasty

 Reading in Li Po
how "the peach blossom follows the water"
I keep thinking of you
because you were so much like
Chairman Mao,
naturally with the sex 
and the figure slighter.
Loving you was a kind of Chinese guerilla war.
Thanks to your lightfoot genius no Eighth Route Army kept its lines more fluid, traveled with less baggage so nibbled the advantage.
Even with your small bad heart you made a dance of departures.
In the cold spring rains when last you failed me I had nothing left to spend but a red crayon language on the character of the enemy to break appointments, to fight us not with his strength but with his weakness, to kill us not with his health but with his sickness.
Pet, spitfire, blue-eyed pony, here is a new note I want to pin on your door, though I am ten years late and you are nowhere: Tell me, are you stillmistress of the valley, what trophies drift downriver, why did you keep me waiting?

Written by Li Po |

Farewell to Secretary Shu-yun at the Hsieh Tiao Villa in Hsuan-Chou

 Since yesterday had throw me and bolt,
Today has hurt my heart even more.
The autumn wildgeese have a long wing for escort As I face them from this villa, drinking my wine.
The bones of great writers are your brushes, in the school of heaven, And I am Lesser Hsieh growing up by your side.
We both are exalted to distant thought, Aspiring to the sky and the bright moon.
But since water still flows, though we cut it with our swords, And sorrow return,though we drown them with wine, Since the world can in no way answer our craving, I will loosen my hair tomorrow and take to a fishing-boat.

Written by Ezra Pound |

The River-Merchants Wife: A Letter

 After Li Po

While my hair was still cut straight 
 across my forehead
I played at the front gate, pulling
You came by on bamboo stilts, playing horse, You walked about my seat, playing with blue plums.
And we went on living in the village of Chokan: Two small people, without dislike or suspicion.
At fourteen I married My Lord you.
I never laughed, being bashful.
Lowering my head, I looked at the wall.
Called to, a thousand times, I never looked back.
At fifteen I stopped scowling, I desired my dust to be mingled with yours Forever and forever and forever.
Why should I climb the lookout? At sixteen you departed, You went into far Ku-to-en, by the river of swirling eddies, And you have been gone five months.
The monkeys make sorrowful noise overhead.
You dragged your feet when you went out, By the gate now, the moss is grown, the different mosses, Too deep to clear them away! The leaves fall early this autumn, in wind.
The paired butterflies are already yellow with August Over the grass in the West garden; They hurt me.
I grow older.
If you are coming down through the narrows of the river Kiang, Please let me know beforehand, And I will come out to meet you As far as Cho-fu-sa.

Written by Li Po |

Under the Moon

 Under the crescent moon's faint glow
The washerman's bat resounds afar,
And the autumn breeze sighs tenderly.
But my heart has gone to the Tartar war, To bleak Kansuh and the steppes of snow, Calling my husband back to me.

Written by Li Po |

A Mountain Revelry

 To wash and rinse our souls of their age-old sorrows,
We drained a hundred jugs of wine.
A splendid night it was .
In the clear moonlight we were loath to go to bed, But at last drunkenness overtook us; And we laid ourselves down on the empty mountain, The earth for pillow, and the great heaven for coverlet.

Written by Li Po |

Good Old Moon

 When I was a boy I called the moon a
white plate of jade, sometimes it looked
like a great mirror hanging in the sky,
first came the two legs of the fairy
and the cassia tree, but for whom the rabbit
kept on pounding medical herbs, I
just could not guess.
Now the moon is being swallowed by the toad and the light flickers out leaving darkness all around; I hear that when nine of the burning suns out of the ten were ordered to be shot down by the Emperor Yao, all has since been quiet and peaceful both for heaven and man, but this eating up of the moon is for me a truly ugly scene filling me with forebodings wondering what will come out of it.

Written by Li Po |

Quiet Night Thoughts

 Before my bed
there is bright moonlight
So that it seems
Like frost on the ground:

Lifting my head
I watch the bright moon,
Lowering my head
I dream that I'm home.

Written by Li Po |

The Old Dust

 The living is a passing traveler;
The dead, a man come home.
One brief journey betwixt heaven and earth, Then, alas! we are the same old dust of ten thousand ages.
The rabbit in the moon pounds the medicine in vain; Fu-sang, the tree of immortality, has crumbled to kindling wood.
Man dies, his white bones are dumb without a word When the green pines feel the coming of the spring.
Looking back, I sigh; looking before, I sigh again.
What is there to prize in the life's vaporous glory?

Written by Li Po |

Hard is the Journey

 Gold vessels of fine wines,
thousands a gallon,
Jade dishes of rare meats,
costing more thousands,

I lay my chopsticks down,
no more can banquet,
I draw my sword and stare
wildly about me:

Ice bars my way to cross
the Yellow River,
Snows from dark skies to climb
the T'ai-hang mountains!

At peace I drop a hook
into a brooklet,
At once I'm in a boat
but sailing sunward.
(Hard is the journey, Hard is the journey, So many turnings, And now where am I?) So when a breeze breaks waves, bringing fair weather, I set a cloud for sails, cross the blue oceans!

Written by Li Po |

Amidst the Flowers a Jug of Wine

 Amidst the flowers a jug of wine, 
I pour alone lacking companionship.
So raising the cup I invite the Moon, Then turn to my shadow which makes three of us.
Because the Moon does not know how to drink, My shadow merely follows the movement of my body.
The moon has brought the shadow to keep me company a while, The practice of mirth should keep pace with spring.
I start a song and the moon begins to reel, I rise and dance and the shadow moves grotesquely.
While I'm still conscious let's rejoice with one another, After I'm drunk let each one go his way.
Let us bind ourselves for ever for passionless journeyings.
Let us swear to meet again far in the Milky Way.

Written by Li Po |

Bringing in the Wine

 See how the Yellow River's water move out of heaven.
Entering the ocean,never to return.
See how lovely locks in bright mirrors in high chambers, Though silken-black at morning, have changed by night to snow.
Oh, let a man of spirit venture where he pleases And never tip his golden cup empty toward the moon! Since heaven gave the talent, let it be employed! Spin a thousand of pieces of silver, all of them come back! Cook a sheep, kill a cow, whet the appetite, And make me, of three hundred bowls, one long drink! .
To the old master, Tsen, And the young scholar, Tan-chiu, Bring in the wine! Let your cups never rest! Let me sing you a song! Let your ears attend! What are bell and drum, rare dishes and treasure? Let me br forever drunk and never come to reason! Sober men of olden days and sages are forgotten, And only the great drinkers are famous for all time.
Prince Chen paid at a banquet in the Palace of Perfection Ten thousand coins for a cask of wine, with many a laugh and quip.
Why say, my host, that your money is gone? Go and buy wine and we'll drink it together! My flower-dappled horse, My furs worth a thousand, Hand them to the boy to exchange for good wine, And we'll drown away the woes of ten thousand generation!