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Best Famous Anthony Hecht Poems

Here is a collection of the all-time best famous Anthony Hecht poems. This is a select list of the best famous Anthony Hecht poetry. Reading, writing, and enjoying famous Anthony Hecht poetry (as well as classical and contemporary poems) is a great past time. These top poems are the best examples of Anthony Hecht poems.

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by Anthony Hecht | |

Lots Wife

 How simple the pleasures of those childhood days,
Simple but filled with exquisite satisfactions.
The iridescent labyrinth of the spider, Its tethered tensor nest of polygons Puffed by the breeze to a little bellying sail -- Merely observing this gave infinite pleasure.
The sound of rain.
The gentle graphite veil Of rain that makes of the world a steel engraving, Full of soft fadings and faint distances.
The self-congratulations of a fly, Rubbing its hands.
The brown bicameral brain Of a walnut.
The smell of wax.
The feel Of sugar to the tongue: a delicious sand.
One understands immediately how Proust Might cherish all such postage-stamp details.
Who can resist the charms of retrospection?


by Anthony Hecht | |

Sarabande On Attaining The Age Of Seventy-Seven

 The harbingers are come.
See, see their mark; White is their colour; and behold my head.
-- George Herbert Long gone the smoke-and-pepper childhood smell Of the smoldering immolation of the year, Leaf-strewn in scattered grandeur where it fell, Golden and poxed with frost, tarnished and sere.
And I myself have whitened in the weathers Of heaped-up Januaries as they bequeath The annual rings and wrongs that wring my withers, Sober my thoughts, and undermine my teeth.
The dramatis personae of our lives Dwindle and wizen; familiar boyhood shames, The tribulations one somehow survives, Rise smokily from propitiatory flames Of our forgetfulness until we find It becomes strangely easy to forgive Even ourselves with this clouding of the mind, This cinerous blur and smudge in which we live.
A turn, a glide, a quarter turn and bow, The stately dance advances; these are airs Bone-deep and numbing as I should know by now, Diminishing the cast, like musical chairs.


by Anthony Hecht | |

Prospects

 We have set out from here for the sublime
Pastures of summer shade and mountain stream;
I have no doubt we shall arrive on time.
Is all the green of that enameled prime A snapshot recollection or a dream? We have set out from here for the sublime Without provisions, without one thin dime, And yet, for all our clumsiness, I deem It certain that we shall arrive on time.
No guidebook tells you if you'll have to climb Or swim.
However foolish we may seem, We have set out from here for the sublime And must get past the scene of an old crime Before we falter and run out of steam, Riddled by doubt that we'll arrive on time.
Yet even in winter a pale paradigm Of birdsong utters its obsessive theme.
We have set out from here for the sublime; I have no doubt we shall arrive on time.


by Anthony Hecht | |

Paradise Lost Book 5: An Epitome

 Higgledy piggeldy
Archangel Rafael,
Speaking of Satan's re-
Bellion from God:

"Chap was decidedly
Turgiversational,
Given to lewdness and
Rodomontade.
"