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The Sausage Candidate-A Tale of the Elections

Written by: Andrew Barton Paterson | Biography
 | Quotes (1) |
 Our fathers, brave men were and strong, 
And whisky was their daily liquor; 
They used to move the world along 
In better style than now -- and quicker.
Elections then were sport, you bet! A trifle rough, there's no denying When two opposing factions met The skin and hair were always flying.
When "cabbage-trees" could still be worn Without the question, "Who's your hatter?" There dawned a bright election morn Upon the town of Parramatta.
A man called Jones was all the go -- The people's friend, the poor's protector; A long, gaunt, six-foot slab of woe, He sought to charm the green elector.
How Jones had one time been trustee For his small niece, and he -- the villain! -- Betrayed his trust most shamefully, And robbed the child of every shillin'.
He used to keep accounts, they say, To save himself in case of trouble; Whatever cash he paid away He always used to charge it double.
He'd buy the child a cotton gown Too coarse and rough to dress a cat in, And then he'd go and put it down And charge the price of silk or satin! He gave her once a little treat, An outing down the harbour sunny, And Lord! the bill for bread and meat, You'd think they all had eaten money! But Jones exposed the course he took By carelessness -- such men are ninnies.
He went and entered in his book, "Two pounds of sausages -- two guineas.
" Now this leaked out, and folk got riled, And said that Jones, "he didn't oughter".
But what cared Jones? he only smiled -- Abuse ran off his back like water.
And so he faced the world content: His little niece -- he never paid her: And then he stood for Parliament, Of course he was a rank free trader.
His wealth was great, success appeared To smile propitious on his banner, But Providence it interfered In this most unexpected manner.
A person -- call him Brown for short -- Who knew the story of this stealer, Went calmly down the town and bought Two pounds of sausage from a dealer, And then he got a long bamboo And tightly tied the sausage to it; Says he, "This is the thing to do, And I am just the man to do it.
"When Jones comes out to make his speech I won't a clapper be, or hisser, But with this long bamboo I'll reach And poke the sausage in his 'kisser'.
I'll bring the wretch to scorn and shame, Unless those darned police are nigh: As sure as Brown's my glorious name, I'll knock that candidate sky-high.
" The speech comes on -- beneath the stand The people push and surge and eddy But Brown waits calmly close at hand With all his apparatus ready; And while the speaker loudly cries, "Of ages all, this is the boss age!" Brown hits him square between the eyes, Exclaiming, "What's the price of sausage?" He aimed the victuals in his face, As though he thought poor Jones a glutton.
And Jones was covered with disgrace -- Disgrace and shame, and beef and mutton.
His cause was lost -- a hopeless wreck He crept off from the hooting throng; Protection proudly ruled the deck, Here ends the sausage and the song.



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