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MFingal - Canto IV

Written by: John Trumbull | Biography
 Now Night came down, and rose full soon
That patroness of rogues, the Moon;
Beneath whose kind protecting ray,
Wolves, brute and human, prowl for prey.
The honest world all snored in chorus, While owls and ghosts and thieves and Tories, Whom erst the mid-day sun had awed, Crept from their lurking holes abroad.
On cautious hinges, slow and stiller, Wide oped the great M'Fingal's cellar, Where safe from prying eyes, in cluster, The Tory Pandemonium muster.
Their chiefs all sitting round descried are, On kegs of ale and seats of cider; When first M'Fingal, dimly seen, Rose solemn from the turnip-bin.
Nor yet his form had wholly lost Th' original brightness it could boast, Nor less appear'd than Justice Quorum, In feather'd majesty before 'em.
Adown his tar-streak'd visage, clear Fell glistening fast th' indignant tear, And thus his voice, in mournful wise, Pursued the prologue of his sighs.
"Brethren and friends, the glorious band Of loyalty in rebel land! It was not thus you've seen me sitting, Return'd in triumph from town-meeting; When blust'ring Whigs were put to stand, And votes obey'd my guiding hand, And new commissions pleased my eyes; Blest days, but ah, no more to rise! Alas, against my better light, And optics sure of second-sight, My stubborn soul, in error strong, Had faith in Hutchinson too long.
See what brave trophies still we bring From all our battles for the king; And yet these plagues, now past before us, Are but our entering wedge of sorrows! "I see, in glooms tempestuous, stand The cloud impending o'er the land; That cloud, which still beyond their hopes Serves all our orators with tropes; Which, though from our own vapors fed, Shall point its thunders on our head! I see the Mob, beflipp'd at taverns, Hunt us, like wolves, through wilds and caverns! What dungeons open on our fears! What horsewhips whistle round our ears! Tar, yet in embryo in the pine, Shall run on Tories' backs to shine; Trees, rooted fair in groves of sallows, Are growing for our future gallows; And geese unhatch'd, when pluck'd in fray, Shall rue the feathering of that day.
"For me, before that fatal time, I mean to fly th' accursed clime, And follow omens, which of late Have warn'd me of impending fate.
"For late in visions of the night The gallows stood before my sight; I saw its ladder heaved on end; I saw the deadly rope descend, And in its noose, that wavering swang, Friend Malcolm hung, or seem'd to hang.
How changed from him, who bold as lion, Stood Aid-de-camp to Gen'ral Tryon, Made rebels vanish once, like witches, And saved his life, but dropp'd his breeches.
I scarce had made a fearful bow, And trembling ask'd him, "How d'ye do;" When lifting up his eyes so wide, His eyes alone, his hands were tied; With feeble voice, as spirits use, Now almost choak'd by gripe of noose; "Ah, fly my friend, he cried, escape, And keep yourself from this sad scrape; Enough you've talk'd and writ and plann'd; The Whigs have got the upper hand.
Could mortal arm our fears have ended, This arm (and shook it) had defended.
Wait not till things grow desperater, For hanging is no laughing matter.
Adventure then no longer stay; But call your friends and haste away.
"For lo, through deepest glooms of night, I come to aid thy second-sight, Disclose the plagues that round us wait, And scan the dark decrees of fate.
"Ascend this ladder, whence unfurl'd The curtain opes of t'other world; For here new worlds their scenes unfold, Seen from this backdoor of the old.
As when Æneas risk'd his life, Like Orpheus vent'ring for his wife, And bore in show his mortal carcase Through realms of Erebus and Orcus, Then in the happy fields Elysian, Saw all his embryon sons in vision; As shown by great Archangel, Michael, Old Adam saw the world's whole sequel, And from the mount's extended space, The rising fortunes of his race: So from this stage shalt thou behold The war its coming scenes unfold, Raised by my arm to meet thine eye; My Adam, thou; thine Angel, I.
But first my pow'r, for visions bright, Must cleanse from clouds thy mental sight, Remove the dim suffusions spread, Which bribes and salaries there have bred; And from the well of Bute infuse Three genuine drops of Highland dews, To purge, like euphrasy and rue, Thine eyes, for much thou hast to view.
Now freed from Tory darkness, raise Thy head and spy the coming days.
For lo, before our second-sight, The Continent ascends in light.
From north to south, what gath'ring swarms Increase the pride of rebel arms! Through every State our legions brave Speed gallant marches to the grave, Of battling Whigs the frequent prize, While rebel trophies stain the skies.
Behold o'er northern realms afar Extend the kindling flames of war! See famed St.
John's and Montreal Doom'd by Montgomery's arm to fall! Where Hudson with majestic sway Through hills disparted plows his way, Fate spreads on Bemus' heights alarms, And pours destruction on our arms; There Bennington's ensanguined plain, And Stony-Point, the prize of Wayne.
Behold near Del'ware's icy roar, Where morning dawns on Trenton's shore, While Hessians spread their Christmas feasts, Rush rude these uninvited guests; Nor aught avails the captured crew Their martial whiskers' grisly hue! On Princeton plains our heroes yield, And spread in flight the vanquish'd field; While fear to Mawhood's heels puts on Wings, wide as worn by Maia's son.
Behold the Pennsylvanian shore Enrich'd with streams of British gore; Where many a veteran chief in bed Of honor rests his slumb'ring head, And in soft vales, in land of foes, Their wearied virtue finds repose! See plund'ring Dunmore's negro band Fly headlong from Virginia's strand; And far on southern hills our cousins, The Scotch M'Donalds, fall by dozens; Or where King's Mountain lifts its head, Our ruin'd bands in triumph led! Behold, o'er Tarlton's blustring train Defeat extends the captive chain! Afar near Eutaw's fatal springs, Lo, rebel Vict'ry spreads her wings! Through all the land, in varied chace, We hunt the rainbow of success, In vain! their Chief, superior still, Eludes our force with Fabian skill; Or swift descending by surprize, Like Prussia's eagle, sweeps the prize.
"I look'd; nor yet, oppress'd with fears, Gave credit to my eyes or ears; But held the sights an empty dream, On Berkley's immaterial scheme; And pond'ring sad with troubled breast, At length my rising doubts express'd.
'Ah, whither thus, by rebels smitten, Is fled th' omnipotence of Britain; Or fail'd its usual guard to keep, Absent from home or fast asleep? Did not, retired to bowers Flysian, Great Mars leave with her his commission, And Neptune erst, in treaty free, Give up dominion o'er the sea? Else where's the faith of famed orations, Address, debate and proclamations, Or courtly sermon, laureat ode, And ballads on the wat'ry God; With whose high strains great George enriches His eloquence of gracious speeches? Not faithful to our Highland eyes, These deadly forms of vision rise.
Some whig-inspiring rebel sprite Now palms delusion on our sight.
I'd scarcely trust a tale so vain, Should revelation prompt the strain; Or Ossian's ghost the scenes rehearse In all the melody of Erse.
" "Too long," quoth Malcolm, "from confusion, You've dwelt already in delusion; As sceptics, of all fools the chief, Hold faith in creeds of unbelief.
I come to draw thy veil aside Of error, prejudice and pride.
Fools love deception, but the wise Prefer sad truths to pleasing lies.
For know, those hopes can ne'er succeed, That trust on Britain's breaking reed.
For weak'ning long from bad to worse, By cureless atrophy of purse, She feels at length with trembling heart, Her foes have found her mortal part.
As famed Achilles, dipp'd by Thetis In Styx, as sung in antient ditties, Grew all case-harden'd o'er, like steel, Invulnerable, save his heel; And laugh'd at swords and spears and squibs, And all diseases, but the kibes; Yet met at last his deadly wound, By Paris' arrow nail'd to ground: So Britain's boasted strength deserts In these her empire's utmost skirts, Removed beyond her fierce impressions, And atmosphere of omnipresence; Nor to this shore's remoter ends Her dwarf-omnipotence extends.
Hence in this turn of things so strange, 'Tis time our principles to change: For vain that boasted faith, that gathers No perquisite, but tar and feathers; No pay, but stripes from whiggish malice, And no promotion, but the gallows.
I've long enough stood firm and steady, Half-hang'd for loyalty already, And could I save my neck and pelf, I'd turn a flaming whig myself.
But since, obnoxious here to fate, This saving wisdom comes too late, Our noblest hopes already crost, Our sal'ries gone, our titles lost, Doom'd to worse suff'rings from the mob, Than Satan's surg'ries used on Job; What hope remains, but now with sleight What's left of us to save by flight? 'Now raise thine eyes, for visions true Again ascending wait thy view.
' "I look'd; and clad in early light, The spires of Boston met my sight; The morn o'er eastern hills afar Illumed the varied scenes of war; Great Howe had sweetly in the lap Of Loring taken out his nap; When all th' encircling hills around With instantaneous breastworks crown'd, With pointed thunders met his sight, Like magic, rear'd the former night.
Each summit, far as eye commands, Shone, peopled with rebellious bands.
Aloft their tow'ring heroes rise, As Titans erst assail'd the skies; Leagued in superior force to prove The sceptred hand of British Jove.
Mounds piled on hills ascended fair With batt'ries placed in middle air, That hurl'd their fiery bolts amain, In thunder on the trembling plain.
I saw, along the prostrate strand Our baffled generals quit the land, Eager, as frighted mermaids, flee T' our boasted element, the sea, And tow'rd their town of refuge fly, Like convict Jews condemn'd to die.
Then to the north I turn'd my eyes, Where Saratoga's heights arise, And saw our chosen vet'ran band Descend in terror o'er the land; T' oppose this fury of alarms, Saw all New-England wake to arms, And every Yankee, full of mettle, Swarm forth, like bees at sound of kettle.
Not Rome, when Tarquin raped Lucretia, Saw wilder must'ring of militia.
Through all the woods and plains of fight, What mortal battles pain'd my sight, While British corses strew'd the shore, And Hudson tinged his streams with gore.
What tongue can tell the dismal day, Or paint the parti-color'd fray, When yeomen left their fields afar To plow the crimson plains of war; When zeal to swords transform'd their shares, And turn'd their pruning hooks to spears, Changed tailor's geese to guns and ball, And stretch'd to pikes the cobbler's awl; While hunters, fierce like mighty Nimrod, Made on our troops a furious inroad, And levelling squint on barrel round, Brought our beau-officers to ground; While sunburnt wigs, in high command, Rush daring on our frighted band, And ancient beards and hoary hair, Like meteors, stream in troubled air; While rifle-frocks drove Gen'rals cap'ring, And Red-coats shrunk from leathern apron, And epaulette and gorget run From whinyard brown and rusty gun.
With locks unshorn not Samson more Made useless all the show of war, Nor fought with ass's jaw for rarity With more success, or singularity.
I saw our vet'ran thousands yield, And pile their muskets on the field, And peasant guards, in rueful plight, March off our captured bands from fight; While every rebel fife in play To Yankee-doodle tuned its lay, And like the music of the spheres, Mellifluous sooth'd their vanquish'd ears.
" "Alas, I cried, what baleful star Sheds fatal influence on the war? And who that chosen Chief of fame, That heads this grand parade of shame?" "There see how fate, great Malcolm cried, Strikes with its bolts the tow'rs of pride! Behold that martial Macaroni, Compound of Phoebus and Bellona, Equipp'd alike for feast or fray, With warlike sword and singsong lay, Where equal wit and valour join! This, this is he--the famed Burgoyne! Who pawn'd his honor and commission, To coax the patriots to submission, By songs and balls secure allegiance, And dance the ladies to obedience.
Oft his Camp-Muses he'll parade At Boston in the grand blockade; And well inspired with punch of arrack, Hold converse sweet in tent or barrack, Aroused to more poetic passion, Both by his theme and situation.
For genius works more strong and clear When close confined, like bottled beer.
So Prior's wit gain'd matchless power By inspiration of the Tower; And Raleigh, once to prison hurl'd, Wrote the whole hist'ry of the world; So Wilkes grew, while in jail he lay, More patriotic every day, But found his zeal, when not confined, Soon sink below the freezing point, And public spirit, once so fair, Evaporate in open air.
But thou, great favourite of Venus, By no such luck shalt cramp thy genius; Thy friendly stars, till wars shall cease, Shall ward th' ill fortune of release, And hold thee fast in bonds not feeble, In good condition still to scribble.
Such merit fate shall shield from firing, Bomb, carcase, langridge and cold iron, Nor trust thy doubly-laurell'd head, To rude assaults of flying lead.
Hence thou, from Yankee troops retreating, For pure good fortune shalt be beaten, Not taken oft, released or rescued, Pass for small change, like simple Prescott; But captured then, as fates befall, Shall stand thy fortune, once for all.
Then raise thy daring thoughts sublime, And dip thy conq'ring pen in rhyme, And changing war for puns and jokes, Write new Blockades and Maids of Oaks.
" This said, he turn'd and saw the tale Had dyed my trembling cheeks with pale; Then pitying in a milder vein, Pursued the visionary strain; "Too much perhaps hath pain'd your view, From vict'ries of the Rebel crew.
Now see the deeds, not small or scanty, Of British valour and humanity; And learn from this heroic sight, How England's sons and friends can fight, In what dread scenes their courage grows, And how they conquer all their foes.
" I look'd, and saw in wintry skies Our spacious prison-walls arise, Where Britons, all their captives taming, Plied them with scourging, cold and famine, By noxious food and plagues contagious Reduced to life's last, fainting stages.
Amid the dead, that crowd the scene, The moving skeletons were seen.
Aloft the haughty Loring stood, And thrived, like Vampire, on their blood, And counting all his gains arising, Dealt daily rations out, of poison.
At hand our troops, in vaunting strain, Insulted all their wants and pain, And turn'd upon the dying tribe The bitter taunt and scornful gibe; And British captains, chiefs of might, Exulting in the joyous sight, On foes disarm'd, with courage daring, Exhausted all their tropes of swearing.
Distain'd around with rebel blood, Like Milton's Lazar house it stood, Where grim Despair presided Nurse, And Death was Regent of the house.
Amazed I cried, "Is this the way That British valor wins the day?" More had I said in strains unwelcome, Till interrupted thus by Malcolm.
"Blame not, said he, but learn the reason Of this new mode of conq'ring treason.
'Tis but a wise, politic plan To root out all the rebel clan; For surely treason ne'er can thrive Where not a soul is left alive; A scheme all other chiefs to surpass, And do th' effectual work to purpose.
Know, War itself is nothing further Than th' art and mystery of Murther; He, who most methods has essay'd, Is the best Gen'ral of the trade, And stands Death's plenipotentiary To conquer, poison, starve and bury.
This Howe well knew and thus began; (Despising Carlton's coaxing plan, To keep his pris'ners well and merry, And deal them food, like commissary, And by parol or ransom vain, Dismiss them all to fight again) Hence his first captives, with great spirit He tied up, for his troops to fire at, And hoped they'd learn on foes thus taken, To aim at rebels without shaking.
Then deep in stratagem, he plann'd The sure destruction of the land; Turn'd famine, torture and despair To useful enginry of war; Sent forth the small-pox, and the greater, To thin the land of every traitor; Spread desolation o'er their head, And plagues in providence's stead; Perform'd with equal skill and beauty Th' avenging Angel's tour of duty: Then bade these prison-walls arise, Like temple tow'ring to the skies, Where British Clemency renown'd Might fix her seat on hallow'd ground, (That Virtue, as each herald saith, Of whole blood kin to Punic Faith) Where all her godlike pow'rs unveiling, She finds a grateful shrine to dwell in: And at this altar for her honor, Chose this High-priest to wait upon her, Who with just rites, in ancient guise, Offers the human sacrifice.
Here every day, her vot'ries tell, She more devours, than th' idol Bel; And thirsts more rav'nously for gore, Than any worshipp'd Power before.
That ancient heathen godhead, Moloch, Oft stay'd his stomach with a bullock; And if his morning rage you'd check first, One child sufficed him for a breakfast: But British clemency with zeal Devours her hundreds at a meal; Right well by nat'ralists defined A being of carniv'rous kind: So erst Gargantua pleased his palate, And eat six pilgrims up in sallad.
Not blest with maw less ceremonious The wide-mouth'd whale, that swallow'd Jonas; Like earthquake gapes, to death devote, That open sepulchre, her throat; The grave or barren womb you'd stuff, And sooner bring to cry, enough; Or fatten up to fair condition The lean-flesh'd kine of Pharaoh's vision.
Behold her temple, where it stands Erect, by famed Britannic hands.
'Tis the Black-hole of Indian structure, New-built in English architecture, On plan, 'tis said, contrived and wrote By Clive, before he cut his throat; Who, ere he took himself in hand, Was her high-priest in nabob-land: And when with conq'ring triumph crown'd, He'd well enslaved the nation round, With tender British heart, the Chief, Since slavery's worse than loss of life, Bade desolation circle far, And famine end the work of war; And loosed their chains, and for their merits Dismiss'd them free to worlds of spirits.
Whence they with choral hymns of praise, Return'd to sooth his latter days, And hov'ring round his restless bed, Spread nightly visions o'er his head.
Now turn thine eyes to nobler sights, And mark the prowess of our fights.
Behold, like whelps of Britain's lion, Our warriors, Clinton, Vaughan, and Tryon, March forth with patriotic joy To ravish, plunder, burn, destroy.
Great Gen'rals, foremost in their nation, The journeymen of Desolation! Like Samson's foxes, each assails, Let loose with firebrands in their tails, And spreads destruction more forlorn, Than they among Philistine corn.
And see in flames their triumphs rise, Illuming all the nether skies, O'er-streaming, like a new Aurora, The western hemisphere with glory! What towns, in ashes laid, confess These heroes' prowess and success! What blacken'd walls and burning fanes, For trophies spread the ruin'd plains! What females, caught in evil hour, By force submit to British power; Or plunder'd negroes in disaster Confess King George their lord and master! What crimson corses strew their way, What smoaking carnage dims the day! Along the shore, for sure reduction, They wield the besom of destruction.
Great Homer likens, in his Ilias, To dogstar bright the fierce Achilles; But ne'er beheld in red procession Three dogstars rise in constellation, Nor saw, in glooms of evening misty, Such signs of fiery triplicity, Which, far beyond the comet's tail, Portend destruction where they sail.
Oh, had Great-Britain's warlike shore Produced but ten such heroes more, They'd spared the pains, and held the station Of this world's final conflagration; Which when its time comes, at a stand, Would find its work all done t' its hand! Yet though gay hopes our eyes may bless, Malignant fate forbids success; Like morning dreams our conquest flies, Dispersed before the dawn arise.
" Here Malcolm paused; when pond'ring long Grief thus gave utt'rance to my tongue.
"Where shrink in fear our friends dismay'd, And where the Tories' promised aid? Can none, amid these fierce alarms, Assist the power of royal arms?" "In vain, he cried, our King depends On promised aid of Tory friends.
When our own efforts want success, Friends ever fail, as fears increase.
As leaves, in blooming verdure wove, In warmth of summer clothe the grove, But when autumnal frosts arise, Leave bare their trunks to wintry skies: So, while your power can aid their ends, You ne'er can need ten thousand friends; But once in want, by foes dismay'd, May advertise them, stol'n or stray'd.
Thus ere Great-Britain's force grew slack, She gain'd that aid she did not lack; But now in dread, imploring pity, All hear unmoved her dol'rous ditty; Allegiance wand'ring turns astray, And Faith grows dim for lack of pay.
In vain she tries, by new inventions, Fear, falsehood, flatt'ry, threats and pensions; Or sends Commiss'ners with credentials Of promises and penitentials.
As, for his fare o'er Styx of old, The Trojan stole the bough of gold, And least grim Cerb'rus should make head, Stuff'd both his fobs with ginger-bread: Behold, at Britain's utmost shifts, Comes Johnstone loaded with like gifts, To venture through the whiggish tribe, To cuddle, wheedle, coax and bribe: And call, to aid his desp'rate mission, His petticoated politician, While Venus, join'd to act the farce, Strolls forth embassadress for Mars.
In vain he strives, for while he lingers, These mastiffs bite his off'ring fingers; Nor buys for George and realms infernal One spaniel, but the mongrel, Arnold.
"'Twere vain to paint, in vision'd show, The mighty nothings done by Howe; What towns he takes in mortal fray, As stations whence to run away; What triumphs gain'd in conflict warm, No aid to us, to them no harm; For still th' event alike is fatal, Whate'er success attend the battle, Whether he vict'ry gain or lose it, Who ne'er had skill enough to use it.
And better 'twere, at their expense, T' have drubb'd him into common sense, And waked, by bastings on his rear, Th' activity, though but of fear.
By slow advance his arms prevail, Like emblematic march of snail, That, be Millennium nigh or far, 'Twould long before him end the war.
From York to Philadelphian ground, He sweeps the pompous flourish round, Wheel'd circ'lar by eccentric stars, Like racing boys at prison-bars, Who take th' opposing crew in whole, By running round the adverse goal; Works wide the traverse of his course, Like ship t' evade the tempest's force; Like mill-horse circling in his race, Advances not a single pace, And leaves no trophies of reduction, Save that of cankerworms, destruction.
Thus having long both countries curst, He quits them as he found them first, Steers home disgraced, of little worth, To join Burgoyne and rail at North.
"Now raise thine eyes and view with pleasure, The triumphs of his famed successor.
" "I look'd, and now by magic lore Faint rose to view the Jersey shore: But dimly seen in gloom array'd, For night had pour'd her sable shade, And every star, with glimm'rings pale, Was muffled deep in ev'ning veil.
Scarce visible, in dusky night Advancing red-coats rose in sight; The length'ning train in gleaming rows Stole silent from their slumb'ring foes; No trembling soldier dared to speak, And not a wheel presumed to creak.
My looks my new surprize confess'd, Till by great Malcolm thus address'd.
"Spend not thy wits in vain researches; 'Tis one of Clinton's moonlight marches.
From Philadelphia now retreating To save his baffled troops a beating, With hasty strides he flies in vain, His rear attack'd on Monmouth plain.
With various chance the dread affray Holds in suspense till close of day, When his tired bands, o'ermatch'd in fight, Are rescued by descending night.
He forms his camp, with great parade, While evening spreads the world in shade, Then still, like some endanger'd spark, Steals off on tiptoe in the dark: Yet writes his king in boasting tone How grand he march'd by light of moon.
I see him, but thou canst not; proud He leads in front the trembling crowd, And wisely knows, as danger's near, 'Twill fall much heaviest on his rear.
Go on, great Gen'ral, nor regard The scoffs of every scribbling bard; Who sings how gods, that fearful night, Aided by miracle your flight, As once they used, in Homer's day, To help weak heroes run away; Tells how the hours, at this sad trial, Went back, as erst on Ahaz' dial, While British Joshua stay'd the moon On Monmouth plains for Ajalon.
Heed not their sneers or gibes so arch, Because she set before your march.
A small mistake! your meaning right; You take her influence for her light: Her influence, which shall be your guide, And o'er your Gen'ralship preside.
Hence still shall teem your empty skull With vict'ries, when the moon's at full, Which by transition passing strange Wane to defeats before the change.
Still shall you steer, on land or ocean, By like eccentric lunar motion; Eclips'd in many a fatal crisis, And dimm'd when Washington arises.
"And see how Fate, herself turn'd traitor, Inverts the ancient course of nature; And changes manners, tempers, climes, To suit the genius of the times! See, Bourbon forms a gen'rous plan, New guardian of the rights of man, And prompt in firm alliance joins To aid the Rebels' proud designs! Behold from realms of eastern day His sails innum'rous shape their way, In warlike line the billows sweep, And roll the thunders of the deep! See, low in equinoctial skies, The western islands fall their prize; See British flags, o'ermatch'd in might, Put all their faith in instant flight, Or broken squadrons, from th' affray, Drag slow their wounded hulks away! Behold his Chiefs, in daring setts, D'Estaignes, De Grasses and Fayettes, Spread through our camps their dread alarms, And swell the fear of rebel arms! Yet ere our glories sink in night, A gleam of hope shall strike your sight; As lamps, that fail of oil and fire, Collect one glimm'ring to expire.
"For lo, where southern shores extend, Behold our gather'd hosts descend, Where Charleston views, with varying beams Her turrets gild th' encircling streams! There by superior force compell'd, Behold their gallant Lincoln yield; Nor aught the wreaths avail him now, Pluck'd from Burgoyne's imperious brow.
See, furious from the vanquish'd strand, Cornwallis leads his mighty band; The southern realms and Georgian shore Submit and own the victor's power; Lo! sunk before his wasting way, The Carolinas fall his prey! See, shrinking from his conq'ring eye, The Rebel legions fall or fly; And with'ring in these torrid skies, The northern laurel fades and dies! With rapid force he leads his train To fair Virginia's cultured plain, Triumphant eyes the travell'd zone, And boasts the southern realm his own.
"Nor yet this hero's glories bright Blaze only in the fields of fight.
Not Howe's humanity more deserving In gifts of hanging and of starving; Not Arnold plunders more tobacco, Or steals more negroes for Jamaica; Scarce Rodney's self, among th' Eustatians, Insults so well the laws of nations; Ev'n Tryon's fame grows dim, and mourning He yields the civic crown of burning.
I see, with pleasure and surprize, New triumph sparkling in your eyes; But view, where now renew'd in might, Again the Rebels dare the fight.
" "I look'd, and far in southern skies Saw Greene, their second hope, arise, And with his small, but gallant, band.
Invade the Carolinian land.
As winds, in stormy circles whirl'd, Rush billowy o'er the darken'd world, And where their wasting fury roves Successive sweep th' astonish'd groves: Thus where he pours the rapid fight, Our boasted conquests sink in night, And far o'er all the extended field Our forts resign, our armies yield, Till now, regain'd the vanquish'd land, He lifts his standard on the strand.
"Again to fair Virginia's coast I turn'd and view'd the British host, Where Chesapeak's wide waters lave Her shores and join th' Atlantic wave.
There famed Cornwallis tow'ring rose, And scorn'd secure his distant foes; His bands the haughty rampart raise, And bid the Royal standard blaze.
When lo, where ocean's bounds extend, Behold the Gallic sails ascend, With fav'ring breezes stem their way, And crowd with ships the spacious bay.
Lo! Washington, from northern shores, O'er many a region wheels his force, And Rochambeau, with legions bright, Descends in terror to the fight.
Not swifter cleaves his rapid way The eagle, cow'ring o'er his prey; Or knights in famed romance, that fly On fairy pinions through the sky.
Amazed, the Briton's startled pride Sees ruin wake on every side, And all his troops, to fate consign'd, By instantaneous stroke, Burgoyned.
Not Cadmus view'd with more surprise, From earth embattled armies rise, Who from the dragon's teeth beheld Men starting fierce with spear and shield.
I saw, with looks downcast and grave, The Chief emerging from his cave, Where chased, like fox, in mighty round, His hunters earth'd him first in ground; And doom'd by fate to rebel sway, Yield all his captured host a prey.
There while I view'd the vanquish'd town, Thus with a sigh my friend went on.
" "Behold'st thou not that band forlorn, Like slaves in Roman triumphs borne, Their faces length'ning with their fears, And cheeks distain'd with streams of tears; Like dramatis personæ sage, Equipp'd to act on Tyburn's stage.
Lo, these are they, who lured by follies Left all, and follow'd great Cornwallis, Expectant of the promised glories, And new Millennial reign of Tories! Alas! in vain, all doubts forgetting, They tried th' omnipotence of Britain; But found her arm, once strong and brave, So shorten'd now, she cannot save.
Not more aghast, departed souls Who risk'd their fate on Popish bulls, And find St.
Peter, at the wicket, Refuse to countersign their ticket, When driven to purgatory back, With each his pardon in his pack; Than Tories, must'ring at their stations, On faith of royal proclamations.
As Pagan chiefs at every crisis, Confirm'd their leagues by sacrifices, And herds of beasts, to all their deities, Oblations fell, at close of treaties: Cornwallis thus, in ancient fashion, Concludes his grand capitulation; And heedless of their screams or suff'rings, Gives up the Tories for sin-off'rings.
See where, relieved from sad embargo, Steer off consign'd a recreant cargo; Like old scape-goats to roam in pain, Mark'd like their great forerunner, Cain.
The rest now doom'd by British leagues To vengeance of resentful Whigs, Hold doubtful lives on tenure ill Of tenancy at Rebel-will, While hov'ring o'er their forfeit persons, The gallows waits his just reversions.
"Thou too, M'Fingal, ere that day, Shalt taste the terrors of th' affray.
See, o'er thee hangs in angry skies, Where Whiggish Constellations rise, And while plebeian signs ascend, Their mob-inspiring aspects bend, That baleful Star, whose horrid hair Shakes forth the plagues of down and tar! I see the pole, that rears on high Its flag terrific through the sky; The mob beneath prepared t' attack, And tar predestined for thy back.
Ah quit, my friend, this dang'rous home, Nor wait the darker scenes to come.
For know, that fate's auspicious door, Once shut to flight, is oped no more; Nor wears its hinge, by changing stations, Like Mercy's door in Proclamations.
"But lest thou pause, or doubt to fly, To stranger visions turn thine eye.
Each cloud, that dimm'd thy mental ray, And all the mortal mists decay.
See, more than human pow'rs befriend, And lo! their hostile forms ascend.
There tow'ring o'er the extended strand, The Genius of this western land, For vengeance arm'd, his sword assumes, And stands, like Tories, dress'd in plumes! See, o'er yon Council-seat, with pride How Freedom spreads her banners wide! There Patriotism, with torch address'd To fire with zeal each daring breast; While all the Virtues in their train, Escaped with pleasure o'er the main, Desert their ancient British station, Possess'd with rage of emigration.
Honor, his bus'ness at a stand, For fear of starving quits their land; And Justice, long disgraced at Court, had By Mansfield's sentence been transported.
Vict'ry and Fame attend their way, Though Britain wish their longer stay; Care not what George or North would be at, Nor heed their writs of Ne exeat; But fired with love of colonizing, Quit the fall'n empire for the rising.
" "I look'd, and saw, with horror smitten, These hostile pow'rs averse to Britain.
"When lo, an awful spectre rose, With languid paleness on his brows; Wan dropsies swell'd his form beneath, And iced his bloated cheeks with death; His tatter'd robes exposed him bare To every blast of ruder air; On two weak crutches propp'd he stood, That bent at every step he trod; Gilt titles graced their sides so slender, One, "Regulation," t'other, "Tender;" His breastplate graved, with various dates, "The Faith of all th' United States;" Before him went his funeral pall, His grave stood, dug to wait his fall.
"I started, and aghast I cried, "What means this spectre at their side? What danger from a pow'r so vain, Or union with that splendid train?" "Alas, great Malcolm cried, experience Might teach you not to trust appearance.
Here stands, as dress'd by fell Bellona, The ghost of Continental Money! Of Dame Necessity descended, With whom Credulity engender'd: Though born with constitution frail, And feeble strength, that soon must fail, Yet strangely vers'd in magic lore, And gifted with transforming power.
His skill the wealth Peruvian joins, With diamonds of Brazilian mines.
As erst Jove fell, by subtle wiles, On Danae's apron through the tiles, In show'rs of gold; his potent wand Shall shed like show'rs o'er all the land.
Less great the wondrous art was reckon'd Of tallies cast by Charles the second, Or Law's famed Missisippi schemes, Or all the wealth of South-Sea dreams.
For he, of all the world, alone Owns the long-sought Philos'pher's stone, Restores the fabulous times to view, And proves the tale of Midas true.
O'er heaps of rags he waves his wand; All turn to gold at his command, Provide for present wants and future, Raise armies, victual, clothe, accoutre, Adjourn our conquests by essoin, Check Howe's advance, and take Burgoyne; Then makes all days of payment vain, And turns all back to rags again.
In vain great Howe shall play his part To ape and counterfeit his art; In vain shall Clinton, more belated, A conj'rer turn to imitate it.
With like ill luck and pow'rs as narrow, They'll fare, like sorcerers of old Pharaoh; Who, though the art they understood Of turning rivers into blood, And caused their frogs and snakes t' exist, That with some merit croak'd and hiss'd, Yet ne'er by every quaint device Could frame the true Mosaic lice.
He for the Whigs his arts shall try, Their first, and long their sole, ally; A Patriot firm, while breath he draws, He'll perish in his Country's cause, And when his magic labors cease, Lie buried in eternal peace.
Now view the scenes, in future hours, That wait the famed European powers.
See, where yon chalky cliffs arise, The hills of Britain strike your eyes; Its small extension long supplied By full immensity of pride; So small, that had it found a station In this new world, at first creation, Or doom'd by justice, been betimes Transported over for its crimes, We'd find full room for't in lake Erie, or That larger water-pond, Superior, Where North at margin taking stand, Would scarce be able to spy land.
See, dwindling from her height amain, What piles of ruin spread the plain; With mould'ring hulks her ports are fill'd, And brambles clothe the lonely field! See, on her cliffs her Genius lies, His handkerchief at both his eyes, With many a deep-drawn sigh and groan, To mourn her ruin, and his own! While joyous Holland, France and Spain With conq'ring navies awe the main; And Russian banners wide unfurl'd Spread commerce round the eastern world.
And see, (sight hateful and tormenting!) This Rebel Empire, proud and vaunting, From anarchy shall change her crasis, And fix her pow'r on firmer basis; To glory, wealth and fame ascend, Her commerce wake, her realms extend; Where now the panther guards his den, Her desert forests swarm with men; Gay cities, tow'rs and columns rise, And dazzling temples meet the skies; Her pines, descending to the main, In triumph spread the wat'ry plain, Ride inland seas with fav'ring gales, And crowd her ports with whitening sails: Till to the skirts of western day, The peopled regions own her sway.
" Thus far M'Fingal told his tale, When startling shouts his ears assail; And strait the Constable, their sentry, Aghast rush'd headlong down the entry, And with wild outcry, like magician, Dispersed the residue of vision.
For now the Whigs the news had found Of Tories must'ring under ground, And with rude bangs and loud uproar, 'Gan thunder furious at the door.
The lights put out, each tory calls, To cover him on cellar walls, Creeps in each box, or bin, or tub, To hide him from the rage of mob, Or lurks, where cabbage-heads in row Adorn'd the sides with verdant show.
M'Fingal deem'd it vain to stay, And risk his bones in second fray: But chose a grand retreat from foes, In literal sense, beneath their nose.
The window then, which none else knew, He softly open'd and crept through, And crawling slow in deadly fear, By movements wise made good his rear.
Then scorning all the fame of martyr, For Boston took his swift departure, Nor look'd back on the fatal spot, More than the family of Lot.
Not North in more distress'd condition, Out-voted first by opposition; Nor good King George, when our dire phantom Of Independence came to haunt him, Which hov'ring round by night and day, Not all his conj'rors e'er could lay.
His friends, assembled for his sake, He wisely left in pawn, at stake, To tarring, feath'ring, kicks and drubs Of furious, disappointed mobs, Or with their forfeit heads to pay For him, their leader, crept away.
So when wise Noah summon'd greeting, All animals to gen'ral meeting, From every side the members went, All kinds of beasts to represent; Each, from the flood, took care t' embark, And save his carcase in the ark: But as it fares in state and church, Left his constituents in the lurch.



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