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From The First Act Of The Aminta Of Tasso

Written by: Anne Kingsmill Finch | Biography
 Daphne's Answer to Sylvia, declaring she
should esteem all as Enemies, 
who should talk to her of LOVE.
THEN, to the snowy Ewe, in thy esteem, The Father of the Flock a Foe must seem, The faithful Turtles to their yielding Mates.
The cheerful Spring, which Love and Joy creates, That reconciles the World by soft Desires, And tender Thoughts in ev'ry Breast inspires, To you a hateful Season must appear, Whilst Love prevails, and all are Lovers here.
Observe the gentle Murmurs of that Dove, And see, how billing she confirms her Love! For this, the Nightingale displays her Throat, And Love, Love, Love, is all her Ev'ning Note.
The very Tygers have their tender Hours, And prouder Lyons bow beneath Love's Pow'rs.
Thou, prouder yet than that imperious Beast, Alone deny'st him Shelter in thy Breast.
But why should I the Creatures only name That Sense partake, as Owners of this Flame? Love farther goes, nor stops his Course at these: The Plants he moves, and gently bends the Trees.
See how those Willows mix their am'rous Boughs; And, how that Vine clasps her supporting Spouse! The silver Firr dotes on the stately Pine; By Love those Elms, by Love those Beeches join.
But view that Oak; behold his rugged Side: Yet that rough Bark the melting Flame do's hide.
All, by their trembling Leaves, in Sighs declare And tell their Passions to the gath'ring Air.
Which, had but Love o'er Thee the least Command, Thou, by their Motions, too might'st understand.
AMINTOR, being ask'd by THIRSIS Who is the Object of his Love? speaks as follows.
Amint.
THIRSIS! to Thee I mean that Name to show, Which, only yet our Groves, and Fountains know: That, when my Death shall through the Plains be told, Thou with the wretched Cause may'st that unfold To every-one, who shall my Story find Carv'd by thy Hand, in some fair Beeches rind; Beneath whose Shade the bleeding Body lay: That, when by chance she shall be led that way, O'er my sad Grave the haughty Nymph may go, And the proud Triumph of her Beauty shew To all the Swains, to Strangers as they pass; And yet at length she may (but Oh! alas! I fear, too high my flatt'ring Hopes do soar) Yet she at length may my sad Fate deplore; May weep me Dead, may o'er my Tomb recline, And sighing, wish were he alive and Mine! But mark me to the End– Thir.
Go on; for well I do thy Speech attend, Perhaps to better Ends, than yet thou know'st.
Amint.
Being now a Child, or but a Youth at most, When scarce to reach the blushing Fruit I knew, Which on the lowest bending Branches grew; Still with the dearest, sweetest, kindest Maid Young as myself, at childish Sports I play'd.
The Fairest, sure, of all that Lovely Kind, Who spread their golden Tresses to the Wind; Cydippe's Daughter, and Montano's Heir, Whose Flocks and Herds so num'rous do appear; The beauteous Sylvia; She, 'tis She I love, Warmth of all Hearts, and Pride of ev'ry Grove.
With Her I liv'd, no Turtles e'er so fond.
Our Houses met, but more our Souls were join'd.
Together Nets for Fish, and Fowl we laid; Together through the spacious Forest stray'd; Pursu'd with equal Speed the flying Deer, And of the Spoils there no Divisions were.
But whilst I from the Beasts their Freedom won, Alas! I know not how, my Own was gone.
By unperceiv'd Degrees the Fire encreas'd, Which fill'd, at last, each corner of my Breast; As from a Root, tho' scarce discern'd so small, A Plant may rise, that grows amazing tall.
From Sylvia's Presence now I could not move, And from her Eyes took in full Draughts of Love, Which sweetly thro' my ravish'd Mind distill'd; Yet in the end such Bitterness wou'd yield, That oft I sigh'd, ere yet I knew the cause, And was a Lover, ere I dream'd I was.
But Oh! at last, too well my State I knew; And now, will shew thee how this Passion grew.
Then listen, while the pleasing Tale I tell.
THIRSIS persuades AMINTOR not to despair upon the redictions of Mopsus discov'ring him to be an Impostor.
Thirsis.
Why dost thou still give way to such Despair! Amintor.
Too just, alas! the weighty Causes are.
Mopsus, wise Mopsus, who in Art excels, And of all Plants the secret Vertue tells, Knows, with what healing Gifts our Springs abound, And of each Bird explains the mystick Sound; 'Twas He, ev'n He! my wretched Fate foretold.
Thir.
Dost thou this Speech then of that Mopsus hold, Who, whilst his Smiles attract the easy View, Drops flatt'ring Words, soft as the falling Dew; Whose outward Form all friendly still appears, Tho' Fraud and Daggers in his Thoughts he wears, And the unwary Labours to surprize With Looks affected, and with riddling Lyes.
If He it is, that bids thy Love despair, I hope the happier End of all thy Care.
So far from Truth his vain Predictions fall.
Amint.
If ought thou know'st, that may my Hopes recall, Conceal it not; for great I've heard his Fame, And fear'd his Words– Thir.
–When hither first I came, And in these Shades the false Imposter met, Like Thee I priz'd, and thought his Judgment great; On all his study'd Speeches still rely'd, Nor fear'd to err, whilst led by such a Guide: When on a Day, that Bus'ness and Delight My Steps did to the Neighb'ring Town invite, Which stands upon that rising Mountain's side, And from our Plains this River do's divide, He check'd me thus–Be warn'd in time, My Son, And that new World of painted Mischiefs shun, Whose gay Inhabitants thou shalt behold Plum'd like our Birds, and sparkling all in Gold; Courtiers, that will thy rustick Garb despise, And mock thy Plainness with disdainful Eyes.
But above all, that Structure see thou fly, Where hoarded Vanities and Witchcrafts lie; To shun that Path be thy peculiar Care.
I ask, what of that Place the Dangers are: To which he soon replies, there shalt thou meet Of soft Enchantresses th' Enchantments sweet, Who subt'ly will thy solid Sense bereave, And a false Gloss to ev'ry Object give.
Brass to thy Sight as polish'd Gold shall seem, And Glass thou as the Diamond shalt esteem.
Huge Heaps of Silver to thee shall appear, Which if approach'd, will prove but shining Air.
The very Walls by Magick Art are wrought, And Repitition to all Speakers taught: Not such, as from our Ecchoes we obtain, Which only our last Words return again; But Speech for Speech entirely there they give, And often add, beyond what they receive.
There downy Couches to false Rest invite, The Lawn is charm'd, that faintly bars the Light.
No gilded Seat, no iv'ry Board is there, But what thou may'st for some Delusion fear: Whilst, farther to abuse thy wond'ring Eyes, Strange antick Shapes before them shall arise; Fantastick Fiends, that will about thee flock, And all they see, with Imitation mock.
Nor are these Ills the worst.
Thyself may'st be Transform'd into a Flame, a Stream, a Tree; A Tear, congeal'd by Art, thou may'st remain, 'Till by a burning Sigh dissolv'd again.
Thus spake the Wretch; but cou'd not shake my Mind.
My way I take, and soon the City find, Where above all that lofty Fabrick stands, Which, with one View, the Town and Plains commands.
Here was I stopt, for who cou'd quit the Ground, That heard such Musick from those Roofs resound! Musick! beyond th' enticing Syrene's Note; Musick! beyond the Swan's expiring Throat; Beyond the softest Voice, that charms the Grove, And equal'd only by the Spheres above.
My Ear I thought too narrow for the Art, Nor fast enough convey'd it to my Heart: When in the Entrance of the Gate I saw A Man Majestick, and commanding Awe; Yet temper'd with a Carriage, so refin'd That undetermin'd was my doubtful Mind, Whether for Love, or War, that Form was most design'd.
With such a Brow, as did at once declare A gentle Nature, and a Wit severe; To view that Palace me he ask'd to go, Tho' Royal He, and I Obscure and Low.
But the Delights my Senses there did meet, No rural Tongue, no Swain can e'er repeat.
Celestial Goddesses, or Nymphs as Fair, In unveil'd Beauties, to all Eyes appear Sprinkl'd with Gold, as glorious to the View, As young Aurora, deck'd with pearly Dew; Bright Rays dispensing, as along they pass'd, And with new Light the shining Palace grac'd.
Phoebus was there by all the Muses met, And at his Feet was our Elpino set.
Ev'n humble Me their Harmony inspir'd, My Breast expanded, and my Spirits fir'd.
Rude Past'ral now, no longer I rehearse, But Heroes crown with my exalted Verse.
Of Arms I sung, of bold advent'rous Wars; And tho' brought back by my too envious Stars, Yet kept my Voice and Reed those lofty Strains, And sent loud Musick through the wond'ring Plains: Which Mopsus hearing, secretly malign'd, And now to ruin Both at once design'd.
Which by his Sorceries he soon brought to pass; And suddenly so clogg'd, and hoarse I was, That all our Shepherds, at the Change amaz'd, Believ'd, I on some Ev'ning-Wolf had gaz'd: When He it was, my luckless Path had crost, By whose dire Look, my Skill awhile was lost.
This have I told, to raise thy Hopes again, And render, by distrust, his Malice vain.
From the AMINTA of TASSO.
THO' we, of small Proportion see And slight the armed Golden Bee; Yet if her Sting behind she leaves, No Ease th' envenom'd Flesh receives.
Love, less to Sight than is this Fly, In a soft Curl conceal'd can lie; Under an Eyelid's lovely Shade, Can form a dreadful Ambuscade; Can the most subtil Sight beguile Hid in the Dimples of a Smile.
But if from thence a Dart he throw, How sure, how mortal is the Blow! How helpless all the Pow'r of Art To bind, or to restore the Heart! From the AMINTA of TASSO.
Part of the Description of the Golden Age.
THEN, by some Fountains flow'ry side The Loves unarm'd, did still abide.
Then, the loos'd Quiver careless hung, The Torch extinct, the Bow unstrung.
Then, by the Nymphs no Charms were worn, But such as with the Nymphs were born.
The Shepherd cou'd not, then, complain, Nor told his am'rous Tale in vain.
No Veil the Beauteous Face did hide, Nor harmless Freedom was deny'd.
Then, Innocence and Virtue reign'd Pure, unaffected, unconstrain'd.
Love was their Pleasure, and their Praise, The soft Employment of their Days.



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