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On - On - Poet

Written by: Aleister Crowley | Biography
 | Quotes (23) |
 I to the open road,
You to the hunchbacked street -
Which of us two
Shall the earlier rue
That day we chanced to meet?


I with a heart that's sound,
You with sick fancies of pain -
Which of us two
Would the earlier rue
If we chanced to meet again?

I jingle homely lore,
While you rhyme is with kiss -
Which of us two
Will the earlier rue
The love of the Hoylake Miss?

Not I the first to go,
Nor I the first to deceive -
Which of us two
Shall the the earliest rue
Our garden of make-believe? 

You were a Chinese god,
I an offering fair,
As we entered the
Garden of Allah,

To sing our holy prayer.
Entered with hearts bowed low, Yet I heard a voice that cried: For he is the god of the Sacrifice, You are the crucified.
It was all make-believe, A foolish game of play, Our garden of Allah A drawing-room, Our Chinese god of clay.
Strings of bruises for pearls, Tears for forget-me-nots, And a deadly pain Of the sickening shame Watching the fading spots.
As quickly they faded, The heart of me faded as well, Until nothing is left Of my garden, But a soul sunk to hell.
Hail! Poet prend ton lute -Je disparaire, No more together we'll enter the Enchanted garden of make-believe, Nor my sad soul listen while thine deceive.
No more you'll be the God of Sacrifice, Nor I the crucified.
Ah, Garden of Allah -how bitter sweet Thy fruit.
Why breakest thou the heart? Why spoilest thou the soul with notes From thy golden lute? Lo! our garden a common room Our Chinese god burnt clay, and The singing of verses a funeral hymn That awakes with awakening day.
'Twas all such a meaningless play, Poet prend ton lute -Je disparaitre.
Hail! Poet, take my hand -we'll walk Still a little way.
I'll not desert thee at the close of day, I, too, must pray.
A beggar asking alms of passers-by, Does not refuse a drink to one who's dry That once by him did lie.
Poet, come close -before I leave for aye Take thou my hand, we'll walk still A little way.
One garment covered both to keep us warm, What harmed the one, was't not the other's harm? Close clasped, one single form.
Was it not meant of aye? Poet, take thou my hand -we'll still Walk a little way.



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