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Fancy - Definition

The definition of: Fancy is below.
There are 2 syllables in the word Fancy.
What rhymes with Fancy?

See poems containing the word: Fancy

Definition of: Fancy

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Poetry Definition

Originally a term synonymous with imagination through the use of metaphors or conceits. It was later downgraded by Romantic critics to mean invention of a more superficial nature.

Example

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Standard Definition

[n] fancy was held by Coleridge to be more casual and superficial than imagination
[n] something many people believe that is false; "they have the illusion that I am very wealthy"
[n] a predisposition to like something; "he had a fondness for whiskey"
[adj] not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes"
[v] imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy"
[v] have a fancy or particular liking or desire for; "She fancied a necklace that she had seen in the jeweler's window"

Synonyms

aureate - (3 syllables), baroque - (2 syllables), battlemented - (4 syllables), busy - (2 syllables), castellated - (4 syllables), castled - (2 syllables), churrigueresco - (5 syllables), churrigueresque - (4 syllables), crackle - (2 syllables), crenelate - (3 syllables), crenelated - (4 syllables), crenellate - (3 syllables), crenellated - (4 syllables), damascene - (3 syllables), damascened - (3 syllables), damask - (2 syllables), dressy - (2 syllables), elaborate - (4 syllables), embattled - (3 syllables), envision - (3 syllables), fanciful - (3 syllables), fantasy - (3 syllables), figure - (2 syllables), flamboy - (2 syllables)

Antonyms

plain

Misc. Definitions

\Fan"cy\, n.; pl. {Fancies}. [Contr. fr. fantasy, OF. fantasie, fantaisie, F. fantaisie, L. phantasia, fr. Gr. ???????? appearance, imagination, the power of perception and presentation in the mind, fr. ???????? to make visible, to place before one's mind, fr. ??????? to show; akin to ????, ???, light, Skr. bh[=a]to shine. Cf. {Fantasy}, {Fantasia}, {Epiphany}, {Phantom}.]
1. The faculty by which the mind forms an image or a representation of anything perceived before; the power of combining and modifying such objects into new pictures or images; the power of readily and happily creating and recalling such objects for the purpose of amusement, wit, or embellishment; imagination. In the soul Are many lesser faculties, that serve Reason as chief. Among these fancy next Her office holds. --Milton.
2. An image or representation of anything formed in the mind; conception; thought; idea; conceit. How now, my lord ! why do you keep alone, Of sorriest fancies your companoins making ? --Shak.
3. An opinion or notion formed without much reflection; caprice; whim; impression. I have always had a fancy that learning might be made a play and recreation to children. --Locke.
4. Inclination; liking, formed by caprice rather than reason; as, to strike one's fancy; hence, the object of inclination or liking. To fit your fancies to your father's will. --Shak.
5. That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value. London pride is a pretty fancy for borders. --Mortimer.
6. A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad. [Obs.] --Shak. {The fancy}, all of a class who exhibit and cultivate any peculiar taste or fancy; hence, especially, sporting characters taken collectively, or any specific class of them, as jockeys, gamblers, prize fighters, etc. At a great book sale in London, which had congregated all the fancy. --De Quincey. Syn: Imagination; conceit; taste; humor; inclination; whim; liking. See {Imagination}.
\Fan"cy\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Fancied}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Fancying}.]
1. To figure to one's self; to believe or imagine something without proof. If our search has reached no farther than simile and metaphor, we rather fancy than know. --Locke.
2. To love. [Obs.] --Shak.
\Fan"cy\, v. t.
1. To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine. He whom I fancy, but can ne'er express. --Dryden.
2. To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners. ``We fancy not the cardinal.'' --Shak.
3. To believe without sufficient evidence; to imagine (something which is unreal). He fancied he was welcome, because those arounde him were his kinsmen. --Thackeray.
\Fan"cy\, a.
1. Adapted to please the fancy or taste; ornamental; as, fancy goods.
2. Extravagant; above real value. This anxiety never degenerated into a monomania, like that which led his [Frederick the Great's] father to pay fancy prices for giants. --Macaulay. {Fancy ball}, a ball in which porsons appear in fanciful dresses in imitation of the costumes of different persons and nations. {Fancy fair}, a fair at which articles of fancy and ornament are sold, generally for some charitable purpose. {Fancy goods}, fabrics of various colors, patterns, etc., as ribbons, silks, laces, etc., in distinction from those of a simple or plain color or make. {Fancy line} (Naut.), a line rove through a block at the jaws of a gaff; -- used to haul it down. {Fancy roller} (Carding Machine), a clothed cylinder (usually having straight teeth) in front of the doffer. {Fancy stocks}, a species of stocks which afford great opportunity for stock gambling, since they have no intrinsic value, and the fluctuations in their prices are artificial. {Fancy store}, one where articles of fancy and ornament are sold. {Fancy woods}, the more rare and expensive furniture woods, as mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, etc.

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